Keyword: what's going on here

  • Ray Paulick<br>Editor-in-Chief

    Word On The Street

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - For some, just getting a horse to Churchill Downs on the first Saturday in May is the realization of a dream. For others who've been there before, it's about winning -- pure and simple.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Made To Be Broken

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - This year brings us to a couple of tried and tested chapters from the unwritten trainers' manual regarding the Kentucky Derby: the "two-prep" and "unraced juvenile" rules.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Change of Speed

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Conventional wisdom suggests front-running horses have a huge advantage if they are allowed to set the tortoise-like fractions established in this year's Blue Grass. But Polytrack has thrown conventional wisdom out the window.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Tune In

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Nobiz Like Shobiz and Tiago have a license to make beautiful music together on the first Saturday in May.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Putting Safety First

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The CHRB's mandate is not only the right thing to do for the safety of horses, it is a benefit to owners, too, and ultimately for the tracks. Fewer injuries ensures there will be more horses in training, which will lead to larger field sizes, which usually translates to increased pari-mutuel handle. Owners are always happier to have horses racing and training rather than convalescing or recovering.

  • Dan Liebman&lt;br&gt;Executive Editor

    Garden State

    <i>By Dan Liebman</i> - New Jersey's Monmouth Park was formally announced as the host site in the fall of 2004, and from the look of the plant in mid-March, the first-time site will be ready to take racing's center stage, though much still remains to be done.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Hoosier Daddy

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Many state racing commissioners talk about cracking down on cheaters in our sport. Indiana regulators are taking serious action.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    New York State of Mess

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - If you're a little confused about the future of racing in New York, join the club. If you're not confused, you're probably not thinking clearly.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Turn Signal

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Twenty years ago, in the infancy of whole-card simulcasting, there were fears that only the so-called "super tracks" would survive -- those offering the highest-quality racing signals to receiving sites around the country.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Fade to Black

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- One of the interesting things about Thoroughbred racing is the penchant so many people have of knocking something into oblivion, and later complaining about the fact it's gone. Take TVG, for example.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Won't Be Fueled Again

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Whether they race cars or horses, cheaters are getting more sophisticated today. Blood-doping agents or venom from exotic snakes and sea creatures are believed to be in use by some unscrupulous horsemen as performance-enhancing stimulants or painkillers. In a sense, it's the same kind of rocket fuel Waltrip's team was accused of putting into its Toyota.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Consistently Inconsistent

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - I had to go all the way to Dubai to hear a panel discussion about how racing officials in various American jurisdictions have different interpretations about the most basic rules infraction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    A Life of Giving

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - So many people owe thanks to Jonabell Farm founder John A. Bell III, who served on countless committees with numerous industry organizations for more than a half-century.

  • Steve Haskin

    Unhappy Ending

    <i>By Steve Haskin</i> - Fairy tales are not supposed to have unhappy endings. Barbaro was to leave New Bolton Medical Center, walking soundly with his head held high, and live happily ever after. But Thoroughbreds, despite the fairy tales they inspire, live in a different realm than Walt Disney.

  • Dan Liebman

    In It To Win It

    <i>By Dan Liebman</i> - On the night of the 36th Eclipse Awards Jan. 22 in Beverly Hills, Calif., every equine flat winner had one thing in common: all raced on Breeders' Cup World Championships day.

  • Ray Paulick
Editor-in-Chief

    Going Forward

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> -- The Jan. 8 announcement of the expansion of the Breeders' Cup to two days, along with the addition of three new $1-million races is symbolic of the organization's dynamic new leadership, one that is willing to take some chances.

  • A Decade of Dawning

    <em>By Richard Zwirn</em> -- A "city boy" and his wife adapt to an agrarian lifestyle as they run a farm in upstate New York.

  • Ray Paulick
Editor-in-Chief

    Purses and Wallet

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The gap between purses in Thoroughbred races in the United States and money spent in the American Thoroughbred auction market widened in 2006. While total purses for the year aren't yet known, the projection is that they will be up by a couple of percentage points to just north of $1.1 billion, which would be an all-time record.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Beyond Barbaro

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Roy and Gretchen Jackson's beloved colt demonstrated other-worldly intelligence, matched only in size and scope by his courage and heart. Barbaro could play the role of the Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, and Tin Man -- after they'd been to see the Wizard of Oz. Wouldn't it be nice if some of those attributes gravitated toward Thoroughbred industry leaders?

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Stopping Steroids

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Steroids have been at the center of scandals in numerous sports, particularly track and field and baseball, but the only steroid scandal in racing is that they are legal.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Winning Rider

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Russell Baze, unlike former Major League baseball star Rickey Henderson, knows his place in history.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Spanning the Globe

    <em>Ray Paulick</em> - It's difficult to get away from talk of synthetic surfaces, whether it concerns racing in North America, Asia, Europe, or Dubai.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Japan Part I

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The Society of International Thoroughbred Auctioneers is employing a classic carrot and stick approach with the Japan Racing Association, acknowledging through official recognition of 60 graded stakes that the JRA's racing quality is high, but warning the organization that no further advancements will be recognized until non-Japanese owners are licensed to compete in that country.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Helping the Horses

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The proposed strategic plan that came out of last month's Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit is one of those documents or white papers that most likely will land in one of two places: the Thoroughbred industry's dust-gathering burial ground of so many other good ideas; or the hands of a leader with the energy, influence, and personal commitment to make a difference.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Forward Progress

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - After a rocky year of changes that touched both the board of directors and the organization's top executives, stakeholders in the Breeders' Cup should feel good about its new direction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Less is More

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - It's too late to change anything for 2007, but California racing will be better served by a serious reduction of racing in 2008 and beyond. It's up to the CHRB to convince the industry it's the right thing to do.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Thanks for the Memories

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - This week's issue of <em>The Blood-Horse</em> takes a trip down memory lane for a look at favorite Breeders' Cup moments. Here are mine.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Broken Record

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - For Thoroughbred trainers driven to succeed, it's all about numbers. That's the way it's been in the Hall of Fame career of D. Wayne Lukas, who virtually rewrote the record books in the 1980s, and that's how it is for his former assistant, Todd Pletcher, who Oct. 14 broke the single-season mark of 92 stakes victories established by Lukas in 1987.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    21 Days and Counting

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - If you didn't find something to like at Belmont Park, Keeneland, or the Oak Tree meeting at Santa Anita Park over the weekend of Oct. 7-8, you must not like horse racing.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    All Out

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Reaction to the Congressional ban on Internet wagering was swift and severe -- at least from stock market investors who previously were bullish about online poker, sports and horse race betting, and casinos.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Sound Investment

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The political power the horse racing industry now enjoys in our nation's capital is a result of a strategy planned and executed by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association, and supported by knowledgeable individuals who understand that contributions to the NTRA's Legislative Action Campaign and Political Action Committee are an investment in their future.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Return for Deposit

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Increased distribution along with the convenience of telephone or Internet betting resulted in double-digit increases of advance deposit wagering handle in 2003-2005. Del Mar reported a 24% increase one year ago, which makes this year's 7% drop all the more puzzling -- and alarming.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Strange Bedfellows

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The median household income for a family living in the United States was $46,326 in 2005 -- about $1,000 less than what a bloodstock agent would make in the purchase of a $950,000 horse if the agent was working for a client who agreed to pay a 5% commission, considered a standard fee by many in the Thoroughbred industry.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Locks

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Last time I looked there were no sure things in racing. There are, however, some pretty safe bets. Here are a few I see.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    A Trying Time

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - There is profound sadness in the Bluegrass region as its residents and extended network of friends and family begin to deal with the tragedy of Comair flight 5191, which left 49 people dead when it crashed on takeoff at the end of Lexington's Blue Grass Airport Runway 26 in the pre-dawn hours of Aug. 27.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Gone Tomorrow?

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - At the 45th Annual Jockey Club Round Table Conference on Matters Pertaining to Racing in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., on Aug. 10, 1997, Ogden Mills "Dinny" Phipps, then and now chairman of The Jockey Club, proclaimed that the "National Thoroughbred Racing Association is an idea whose time has come."

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Surgeries and Steroids

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - A survey of buyers of Thoroughbred weanlings, yearlings, and 2-year-olds discovered that surgeries to correct conformation defects have a significant influence on whether or not someone will buy a horse at public auction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Queen of Saratoga

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - In the few steps she took, in that brief appearance in the Saratoga winner's circle, fans and admirers of Marylou Whitney witnessed uncommon courage and the heart of a champion.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Franchise Fracas

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Over the next few weeks, the contenders and pretenders angling for the right to operate the New York Thoroughbred racing franchise at Aqueduct, Belmont Park, and Saratoga will be finalizing their paperwork in the request for proposal process developed by the Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of Racing.

  • Waiting for Logic

    <i>By Dan Liebman</i> - From the belt buckles to the Longhorns, things are big in Texas. How's this for big--one billion dollars. That's billion, with nine zeros.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Eclipse Expansion

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Keeneland's director of racing, W.B. Rogers Beasley, earlier this year made an interesting case for expansion of the Eclipse Awards from 11 to 15 equine categories (including steeplechasers). Suggested additions were 3-year-old males and 3-year-old fillies on turf, filly and mare sprinters, and turf sprinters.

  • Ray Paulick
Editor-in-Chief

    Cut Down to Size

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - In light of the industry's reticence to hand over any real power to the NTRA, downsized expectations and downsized staffing make perfect sense.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Fool Me Twice

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The Guild officers, convinced this time by California-based jockey Alex Solis in the Chris McCarron role, are in the process of hiring two racing outsiders to direct them: sports agent Dwight Manley, who became a millionaire by acquiring rare coins, and civil rights activist Rev. Jesse Jackson, whose integrity and credibility have never fully recovered from a scandal involving a mistress, a child out of wedlock, and questionable payments.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Beneath the Surface

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - In California, where the safety-conscious California Horse Racing Board has mandated synthetic surfaces by the end of 2007 for the state's major tracks, an opportunity arose for the various track operators to seek a common solution.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Triple Threat

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Beginning in 1985, when the three Triple Crown host racing associations--Churchill Downs, the Maryland Jockey Club, and the New York Racing Association--joined together to form Triple Crown Productions, the series clearly began to benefit and grow. But the alliance has cracked, resulting this past year in separate television contracts and the loss of a title sponsor.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Meet the New Boss

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Some people may have been surprised to see a relatively unknown 18-year-old jockey aboard Jazil in the June 10 Belmont Stakes (gr. I)-but they shouldn't have been.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Serve It Up

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Why has it been so difficult for the racing industry to put together a meaningful series of races leading up to the Breeders' Cup World Championships?

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Hall Monitor

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- For the second consecutive year, no contemporary horses were elected to the National Museum of Racing's Hall of Fame. That is astonishing, considering some of the champions named on the ballot.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Road to Recovery: Commentary by Ray Paulick

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The mood could not have been darker when the horse ambulance left the Pimlico backstretch on the evening of May 20, its precious cargo the shattered dreams of racing fans and horse lovers everywhere.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    A Rose By Any Other Name

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Business was up. Television ratings were down. That's the quick summary from this year's Kentucky Derby (gr. I)--the first run with Yum! Brands as the presenting sponsor.