Keyword: Ray Paulick

  • Ray Paulick<br>Editor-in-Chief

    It's Just Business

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The bidding duel between Dubai's Sheikh Mohammed and Ireland's John Magnier for the $9.7-million sale-topping Storm Cat--Tranquility Lake colt wasn't the only drama at Keeneland in the opening days of the annual September yearling auction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Shelter from the Storm

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Horse racing people have heart. If that was ever in doubt, look no further than the extraordinary steps countless owners, breeders, trainers, jockeys, veterinarians, racing officials, fans, and others have taken in response to the terrible devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Owning Up

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Owner apathy. It's what Ed Friendly called the biggest obstacle to his successful effort a decade ago to overthrow the status quo and form the Thoroughbred Owners of California, the first and surprisingly only state organization to strictly represent horse owners in negotiations with racetracks on important matters such as purse contracts and simulcasting.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Rolling Along

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Unbeaten Lost in the Fog, America's most popular racehorse, is now its best, according to the Aug. 29 poll of racing journalists conducted by the National Thoroughbred Racing Association.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Friends in Need

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - There is a very good reason people are suspicious about Tim Smith's motives in his role as president of Friends of New York Racing, the industry funded think tank and research group behind the proposal to change the business model under which racing in the Empire State is run.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Just Say Yes

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The Racing Medication and Testing Consortium--RMTC for short--is one of the newer acronyms in horse racing's bountiful alphabet soup. Nevertheless, it is doing what many of its verb-challenged siblings are not: making progress on specific issues of concern within the industry.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Dream Win

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The stars were aligned at Saratoga last summer when Marylou Whitney's Birdstone was victorious in the Spa meeting's most prestigious race, the Travers (gr. I). No one personifies Saratoga Springs better than Whitney, whose tireless dedication to fund-raising for numerous charities reaches its zenith during the summer race meeting.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Losing the Handle

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - By year's end, betting on pari-mutuel races run in the United States could fall to its lowest point in five years. Compounding that sobering possibility is this: The percentage of revenue to purses from every dollar wagered is also heading in the wrong direction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Land Wars

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Thoroughbred owners and breeders in California soon must come to grips with the fact two of the state's five major tracks are owned by a company whose primary business is land development, not racing.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    War Weary

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The strange case of War Emblem, the 2002 Eclipse Award-winning 3-year-old now at stud in Japan, keeps getting stranger.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    The Big Chill

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Freezing samples puts cheaters on notice that they are not necessarily free and clear just because the initial drug screening detected no illegal substances.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Funding the Future

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Concern was expressed in this space June 21 that Kentucky's newly created breeders' incentive program could become a divisive issue, one that might sidetrack far more important initiatives down the road than the one that has earmarked an estimated $12 million in annual stud fee taxes for a breeders' fund.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Track and Field

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - In an industry where horse owners and racetrack management often find themselves on opposite sides of an issue, racetrack safety is something upon which both parties certainly can agree. A safe racetrack can help reduce the frequency of injuries to horses and riders and thereby provide long-term economic benefits to both owners and tracks.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    The $12-Million Question

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - It is up to leaders within Kentucky's Thoroughbred industry to devise a program to distribute money for its incentive program, and an industry-imposed deadline of July 1 to finish the job is fast approaching.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Fleeting Moments

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Winners and losers from the 2005 Triple Crown, the last one sponsored by VISA...

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Hall Pass

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - There have been a number of critics (notably in the media) who have said the National Museum of Racing's Hall of Fame needed a change in election procedures that each year designated inductees in jockey, trainer, male horse, and female horse categories. They wouldn't name names publicly, but these critics charged that the Hall of Fame was electing too many individuals who simply did not belong.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Still a Jewel

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - It's hard to believe, but 10 years ago the Belmont Stakes (gr. I) attracted just 37,171 people, a pitiful turnout for what is annually one of American racing's biggest days.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Afleet's Feat

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Only a handful of people were watching on the morning of April 26 when Afleet Alex recorded his first workout over the Churchill Downs strip in preparation for this year's Kentucky Derby.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Fresh Air

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - A lot of grayhairs frowned initially when the National Thoroughbred Racing Association and Breeders' Cup signed an eight-year deal with ESPN, moving racing's championship day to a cable network beginning in 2006. NBC Sports has broadcast the event every year since its inception in 1984.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Kentucky Pride

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - It's been a long time coming for Alice Chandler, who took the reins at Mill Ridge Farm in 1962 after the death of her father, legendary horseman Hal Price Headley.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Bellamy's the Boss

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The "new" Churchill Downs will provide a spectacular setting, and the Thoroughbred foal crop of 2002 has brought forth an intriguing group of candidates...

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Where Are They Now?

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Conglomerate ownership was designed to bring economies of scale to the racetrack segment of the industry. Statistical evidence, along with unconfirmed reports that Hollywood Park may be sold to developers, suggests it hasn't worked very well in Southern California.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Trail Mix

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The road to the Kentucky Derby (gr. I) changes from time to time, and so do the roadmaps printed by the racetracks and used by owners and trainers to get their horses to Churchill Downs in optimum condition on the first Saturday in May.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Century Mark

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - On May 4, 2005, it will be 100 years to the day since Belmont Park opened its doors to the public for the first time.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Hollywood Ending?

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The good old days? They weren't that long ago for horse racing fans in Southern California.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    For Keeps

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- The horse industry now has a strong voice in Frankfort that will be heard.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    The Big Chill

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Human sports and racing have faced the same challenge: the cheaters are ahead of the labs.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Today's Job Market

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - This item of interest from the Feb. 25 issue of <i>USA Today</i>: a horse racing groom has the worst job in sports.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Grape Consequences

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Jess Jackson, the California vintner who is making headlines for his increasing involvement as a Thoroughbred owner and breeder, undoubtedly was more than a mildly interested spectator when the Supreme Court returned to work in Washington, D.C., the week of Feb. 21. So are many others in the racing industry.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Incomparable Gaines

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Best comment I ever heard about John Gaines was from Lexingtonian Arnold Kirkpatrick, who said Gaines was "smarter than a tree full of owls."

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Galloping Ghost

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Nearing $1 million in earnings, Chindi's days as a runner may be numbered, but they aren't over yet.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Raising the Stakes

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Getting caught is no picnic, but occasional fines, suspensions, and hefty legal bills are included in the price some horsemen have been willing to pay to live on, or over, the edge of the game's rules and regulations.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Crossroads

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - It is probably an understatement to say that 2005 is going to be a challenging year for the National Thoroughbred Racing Association/Breeders' Cup. The direction and mission of the organization could be subject to change as it navigates crossroads on the near horizon.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Shaking Things Up

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- There was something a bit unsettling about how the California racing industry began a crackdown in February 2004 against the use of "milkshakes"--the loading of bicarbonates through a stomach tube as a performance-enhancing aid in Thoroughbreds.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Cot To Be Good

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Some unsolicited advice for Cot Campbell, chairman of the Sales Integrity Task Force: Get an unlisted telephone number. Campbell's stewardship of this most difficult issue was inspiring, and his phone soon should be ringing off the hook with inquiries and job offers from scores of failed committees, task forces, and do-nothing organizations within the Thoroughbred world and beyond.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    No Gift Exchange

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The execution of Magna's vision has been difficult given its isolationist philosophy.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Worldwide Woes

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - In many ways, the Japan Racing Association is the envy of the racing world. As a branch of the national government's ministry of agriculture, forestry, and fisheries, the JRA controls all facets of the industry, including racecourse management, scheduling, marketing, licensing, drug testing, and pari-mutuel operations.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Open Book

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Though its brightest days may be in the past, the Japan Racing Association has decided to allow a little more sun to shine on a sport and industry that for the past 50 years has virtually been closed to outsiders.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    KEEP It Up

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- The Kentucky Equine Education Project is critical to the future of all horse breeds in Kentucky.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Every Jockey's Nightmare

    <i>Ray Paulick</i> - David Guillory has never watched a replay of the race that ended his riding career. He's never wanted to. Guillory remembers turning into the stretch, seeing a horse just in front veering in on him, and yelling at the horse's rider. He doesn't recall what happened next, but he doesn't need to see a videotape to remind him.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Bumpy Ride

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The Nov. 7 dispute between a group of riders and the management of Churchill Downs was not the first and surely will not be the last time jockeys have taken action to express displeasure with their plight.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Ayes for Texas

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Lone Star Park was a sight to behold Oct. 30 when the Breeders' Cup World Thoroughbred Championships came to town. An enthusiastic crowd of 53,717 horse lovers from around the world was on hand to take part in the most important day in the history of the Texas racing industry.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Slot the Vote

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Comedian George Carlin would have you believe that "paper or plastic" and "aisle or window" are the only real choices in America these days. With important national, state, and local elections coming up Nov. 2, I beg to differ.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Taking Care of Business

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- This is supposed to be the time of year when the racing world starts talking Saratoga and Del Mar, and the search begins for the hot 2-year-olds who look like they could be Triple Crown prospects 10 months from now.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Ethics For Sale

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Kentucky's two Thoroughbred auction companies, Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland, were not happy when the subject of ethics in the bloodstock market was broached here in an April 3, 2004, editorial.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Serving with Distinction

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- A story in the July 3 issue of <i>The Blood-Horse</i> on the resignation of William S. Farish as the U.S. ambassador to the Court of St. James took an unfair and undeserving shot at the master of Lane's End Farm, a longtime friend of the Bush family whose three-year tenure as ambassador came at one of the most trying times for America since World War II.