Keyword: More Diseases & Conditions

  • Ways to Reduce a Cribber's Colic Risk

    Severe and recurring cases of colic are frequently caused by a horse’s environment, diet, and genetics. Historically, researchers have proven cribbing contributes to an increased risk of colic. Now scientists in the U.K. are working to better understand the link between the two

  • How to Manage a Collapsed Foal

    Foals have seemingly endless energy, darting around their fields, playing with their pasturemates, and recharging with a quick nap and a drink from Mom. But, occasionally, a foal develops a health problem that zaps that energy and leaves him in a collapsed heap, looking sickly and vulnerable. What should you do if this happens to your foal?

  • What Causes Equine Grass Sickness?

    We all know that horses residing at pasture spend the majority of their days grazing. But did you know that, in certain parts of the world, grazing could put a horse at risk for contracting a potentially fatal disease? And what's more, researchers still aren't sure what causes the disease, called equine grass sickness (EGS).

  • Study Compares Abdominal Bandage Types

    It's no secret that leg wraps and bandages applied to horses' lower limbs protect and support the soft tissues within. But what about the abdominal bandages veterinarians wrap around horses' bodies post-colic surgery—do they function in the same way?

  • 10 Hot Weather Horse Care Tips

    Summer heat can be dangerous for horses, resulting in dehydration, lethargy, and general malaise. Severe heat stress can cause diarrhea, or even colic. But owners can take important steps to keep horses safe and comfortable during the hot days ahead.

  • Equine Metabolic Syndrome: What We Know, Where We're Headed

    Easy keepers—horses that remain rotund despite restricted diets and rigid exercise plans—must be managed carefully to prevent or minimize more serious health issues. Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS), one condition associated with obesity, can have a serious negative impact on horses' health. Fortunately, over the past few years, veterinaria...

  • Researchers Identify EOTRH Risk Factors

    As if horses weren't prone to enough injuries and health issues, a new dental disease surfaced in 2004. It's literally a mouthful: equine odontoclastic tooth resorption and hypercementosis (EOTRH). And because it's so recently identified, Ann Pearson, MS, DVM, and her colleagues at Reata Equine Veterinary Group, in Tucson, Ariz., conducted a s...

  • Equine Collapse Reviewed

    There are few things more frightening for an owner than watching their horse collapse without warning or apparent cause. By the same token, unraveling the cause behind an equine collapse often presents veterinarians with a diagnostic challenge, and in many cases the root cause of a horse's collapse can't be determined.

  • Snakebite in Horses

    With warm weather comes the increased risk of snakebite. The major venomous snakes in the United States are the pit vipers, including rattlesnakes, water moccasins, and copperheads. Pit vipers are named after the heat-detecting holes, or pits, on each side of the head that help the snake locate prey. Pit vipers can be differentiated from other snakes by t...

  • Headshaking Supplement Efficacy Tested

    Sure, many horse owners add feed supplements to their horses' diets to help maintain joints, hooves, and hair coats. But what about to stifle headshaking? Researchers at the University of Liverpool in England recently tested the efficacy of a feed supplement designed to alleviate this behavior in a trial involving 32 horses previously diagnosed with c...

  • What to Consider Before Tooth Removal in Horses (AAEP 2012)

    The goal of equine dentistry is to preserve teeth whenever possible, but sometimes that broken or rotten tooth just has to go before it causes more problems such as infection of the sinuses or jawbone. However, before deciding to extract a horse’s tooth, owners and veterinarians must consider a number of important factors, noted a Cornell University...

  • Handling Equine Oral Tooth Extraction Failures (AAEP 2012)

    Dental extractions don’t always go according to plan, so the practitioner needs to be ready for potential complications before removing a tooth. A Pennyslvania practitioner recently described typical reasons why oral extraction fail, alternative approaches when these problems occur, and the equipment, facilities, assistance, and skill a veterinarian...

  • Triaging Acute Equine Neurologic Emergencies

    A horse owner's day can go from great to horrific in a matter of seconds if he or she arrives at the barn to find their charge either staggering around the field or completely unable to rise. A prompt call to the veterinarian is warranted in these scenarios, but what should an owner expect when the veterinarian arrives?

  • Thinking Through Cheek Tooth Extraction Complications (AAEP 2012)

    As far as major dental surgeries go in horses, cheek tooth (premolar and molar) extraction is the most common; unfortunately, more than half these procedures pose risk of complication, noted Edward Earley, DVM, FAVD/Eq, of Laurel Highland Veterinary Clinic, in Williamsport, Penn. He addressed some of these potential complications, ways to minimize their o...

  • Link Identified between Tree Seed and Seasonal Pasture Myopathy

    New research from the University of Minnesota (UM) that was recently published in the Equine Veterinary Journal (EVJ) shows that a toxin from the box elder tree is the likely cause of seasonal pasture myopathy (SPM), the U.S. equivalent of the European disease known as atypical myopathy (AM). Preliminary comparisons of these results with cases of AM in Eu...

  • Diet Restriction for Equine Weight Loss

    Equine obesity is an increasingly common problem, leading many owners to seek safe weight loss solutions for their horse. In most cases veterinarians and nutritionists advise restricting diet and increasing exercise, but with some horses--those suffering from laminitis, for instance--exercise might be contraindicated. This leaves dietary restriction as th...

  • Simultaneous Ivermectin and Solanum Plant Poisoning in Horses

    Ivermectin dewormer is considered safe for horses, even at up to 10 times the recommended dosage. But results of a recent case series documented by researchers at Texas A&M University (TAMU) revealed that horses consuming plants from the toxic Solanum (nightshade) family could be in danger of ivermectin poisoning, even when the anthelmintic is dosed a...

  • Study: EHV-1 Not Linked to Headshaking

    A team of researchers from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), recently tested if idiopathic headshaking in horses could be similar to a condition in humans--trigeminal nerve pain caused by the reactivation of a latent virus.

  • Equine Grass Sickness Vaccine Pilot Study Announced

    According to information contained on The Equine Grass Sickness Fund's website, the Veterinary Medicines Directorate has approved a pilot trial of a grass sickness vaccine. The study, being conducted in conjunction with The Animal Health Trust and the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at the University of Edinburgh, will include 100 horses and...

  • Fluoridated Water and Horses

    The potential risk of fluoride-supplemented public water to horses is a topic that periodically arises. A casual internet search of this topic can uncover alarming reports purporting fluoride poisoning in horses from fluoridated municipal water. These reports typically are published in non-peer reviewed sources and are missing important information necess...

  • Older Horses: Decreased Thermoregulation During Exercise

    Experience and instinct tell us to condition older horses carefully, keeping a close eye on how they handle their workouts. A team of researchers at Rutgers University confirmed these instincts when they examined senior horses' propensity for developing hyperthermia, or elevated body temperature, when exercising.