Keyword: medication

  • Alan Foreman

    Horsemen: Put Brakes on Race-Day Salix Ban

    The largest horsemen's groups in the country said they don't support a call by the Association of Racing Commissioners International for a five-year phase-out of race-day anti-bleeding medications.

  • TOBA Latest Group to Support Medication Ban

    The Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association said April 14 it supports the recent proposal by the Association of Racing Commissioners International to develop a plan to eliminate the use of race-day medication.

  • Sources: Waterman Leaving Post at RMTC

    Dr. Scot Waterman, executive director of the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium for almost 10 years, is leaving the post at the end of April, according to multiple industry sources.

  • KTA Supports, NTRA Discusses, Drug Phase-Out

    The Kentucky Thoroughbred Association and Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, which operate as one entity, issued a statement April 12 saying it supports a call by RCI to phase out race-day medication.

  • Montaineer Race Track

    New WV Rules of Racing Take Effect July 10

    An overhaul of the West Virginia rules of racing, including revisions in the area of equine medication and penalties, has passed the state legislature. The document was filed April 11 with the Secretary of State.

  • RCI: Phase Out Use of Drugs in Five Years

    In an announcement that could meet with disagreement with some horsemen's groups and perhaps others, the Association of Racing Commissioners International has called for a five-year phase-out of equine medication in racing.

  • RCI Board Votes to Lower Bute Threshold

    The Association of Racing Commissioners International board of directors voted Oct. 22 to lower the threshold level for phenylbutazone from five micrograms per milliliter of plasma or serum to two.

  • Give Bute the Boot - By Eric Mitchell

    Few issues in horse racing fire up people's emotions like medication. A couple of years ago the target was anabolic steroids, and the industry reacted quickly.

  • Upset Lingers Over Proposed Bute Regulation

    The largest horsemen's group in the country continues to call for the racing industry to perform thorough research before it continues with its plan to lower the testing threshold for phenylbutazone.

  • KY Panel Approves Out-of-Competition Testing

    The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, operating on a tight schedule, approved a regulation Sept. 7 governing out-of-competition equine drug testing with plans to have it in place in advance of the Nov. 5-6 Breeders' Cup.

  • KHRC Pledges to Consider Input on Testing

    Kentucky Horse Racing Commission officials acknowledged concerns about aspects of the proposed out-of-competition testing of racehorses and pledged Aug. 25 to consider the input before the regulations are approved.

  • Officials Cite Progress Made in Drug Testing

    Laboratories that test samples for the presence of drugs in California, Delaware, Kentucky, New York, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and other states have signed letters of intent to submit to accreditation.

  • Kentucky Drug-Test Upgrade Needed for BC

    The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission hopes to expedite regulations for out-of-competition testing and have them in place in time for this year's Breeders' Cup World Championships at Churchill Downs.

  • RMTC Acts to Reduce Potential Impact of Bute

    The Racing Medication and Testing Consortium has lowered the testing threshold level for phenylbutazone, a commonly used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, but has kept the administration time at 24 hours prior to a race.

  • RCI Plan Targets Regulation, Drugs, Wagering

    As it prepares for its annual meeting April 12-15, the Association of Racing Commissioners International has released a three-year strategic plan focusing on reforms in regulation, medication, and wagering security.

  • Kentucky Has New Equine Drug-Testing Contract

    The company that conducts equine drug testing in Great Britain but which has not been involved in testing of horses in America has been awarded the contract to handle the testing of horses racing in Kentucky.

  • NY Drug-Testing Lab to Move From Cornell

    New York lawmakers have given approval to move the state's equine drug-testing laboratory from Cornell University to Morrisville State College. The Senate and Assembly both approved the move March 1.

  • Drug Uniformity Remains Somewhat Elusive

    Though studies have been completed to determine threshold levels for almost 20 therapeutic medications, it doesn't mean the industry will know for certain whether the drugs can impact equine performance.

  • Can Public, Fans Understand Drug Testing?

    The sensitivity of equine drug testing is a big plus for the racing industry, but it also has created confusion. How are the public and media supposed to understand when some industry participants can't make sense of it?

  • Trainer Kiaran McLaughlin

    McLaughlin Takes Suspensions for Trace Levels

    Trainer Kiaran McLaughlin will serve three concurrent 30-day suspensions handed down by the Kentucky Racing Commission for three individual medication violations, the New York-based horseman confirmed Dec. 1.

  • Move Planned for New York Drug-Testing Lab

    After nearly four decades, New York's Cornell University is moving to close its world-famous equine drug-testing laboratory. An equine science program at a state university 70 miles up the road is eagerly willing to take over, and expand, an operation vital to the state's horse industry.

  • Class 1 Positive Brings One-Year Suspension

    Trainer Dave Anderson has been suspended for one year after Reach One More tested positive for oxymorphone following his victory in the Aug. 1 Iowa Stallion Stakes at Prairie Meadows Racetrack & Casino.

  • Joe Gorajec, executive director of the Indiana Horse Racing Commission.

    Medication Issues Top Jockey Club Round Table

    Though there are differences of opinion on what should be done next in the area of medication reform, everyone seems to agree there is a continuing problem and something should be done.

  • NY May Demand Horses' Complete Vet Records

    State racing regulators in New York, seeking additional and timely information about medications given to racehorses, are eyeing a major crackdown on recordkeeping practices by Thoroughbred owners and trainers.

  • Possible Change in Drug Rules Questioned

    The Association of Racing Commissioners International is looking at extending the cutoff time for use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in racehorses beyond 24 hours prior to a race, but horsemen's groups claim the action is premature.

  • Horsemen, Chemist: Drug Problem Exaggerated

    The National Horsemen's Benevolent and Protective Association said July 1 it plans to be more involved as the racing industry considers medication and drug-testing policies horsemen believe could be detrimental and counterproductive.

  • It's a Bird could be disqualified from his April 4 victory in the Oaklawn Handicap.

    It's a Bird Positive After Oaklawn Handicap

    It's a Bird, winner of the Lone Star Handicap (gr. III) on Memorial Day, could lose the purse from his April 4 victory in the Oaklawn Handicap (gr. II) as the result of a positive test for the prohibited substance naproxen, an anti-inflammatory medication.

  • HealthWatch: Surface Safety and Medication

    3D dynamometric shoe gives insight into the biomechanical effects of diverse surfaces on the entire musculoskeletal system; Nanomedicine is a rapidly expanding field and is anticipated to have a huge impact on equine practice in the not-so-distant future.

  • Changes Ahead for Drug-Testing Protocol

    The Racing Medication and Testing Consortium is developing protocol designed to streamline and improve equine drug-testing in the United States. And it is taking a few pages from a 1991 study that didn't gain any traction in the racing industry when it was released.

  • New Targets for Medication Regulation

    Though most racing jurisdictions in North America have greatly curtailed the use of race-day medication, two drugs commonly used in racehorses are getting a hard look from industry officials.

  • Jeff Mullins

    Mullins: NY Incident 'Honest Mistake'

    On April 6, two days after Gato Go Win was scratched from the Bay Shore Stakes (gr.III) at Aqueduct because the horse's trainer, Jeff Mullins, was observed administrating an orally-injected substance to his horse in the detention barn, the New York State Racing and Wagering Board said the "matter is still in the hands" of the Aqueduct stewards.