Keyword: Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome

  • Jockey Club Issues Call for 2001 Live Foal/No Foal Reports

    The Jockey Club is asking breeders to submit their 2001 Live Foal/No Foal Reports as soon as possible after the birth of the foal or when it is determined that a mare will not produce a live foal this year. The request is coming on the heels of the recent mare reproductive loss syndrome in Kentucky and surrounding states.

  • Riboletta Returns To Training

    Champion racemare Riboletta will return to training after falling victim to the mysterious mare reproductive loss syndrome that has devastated Kentucky. Riboletta will return to trainer Eduardo Inda's barn in California.

  • This insect is now leading suspect in cause of Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome.

    Researchers Shift Attention to Eastern Tent Caterpillar

    Discussions of results obtained to date by several scientists and consultants working on the investigation into the cause of Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome (MRLS) on Monday have caused the investigation to shift to a more thorough examination of the potential role of the Eastern Tent Caterpillar (ETC) in MRLS.

  • NTRA, Horse Council Continue Disaster Relief Meetings With Federal Officials

    American Horse Council president Jay Hickey and National Thoroughbred Racing Association deputy commissioner Greg Avioli are meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday afternoon with Caroly Cooksie, deputy administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture disaster relief loan programs. The meeting is a follow-up to talks held last week in Washington involving Hickey and NTRA commissioner Tim Smith and a number of federal legislators, including Rep. Larry Combest, an Amarillo, Texas, Republican who is chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.

  • Many Kentucky Mares Now Holding Pregnancies at Normal Rate; Impact Seen at 21% of Crop

    An informal survey of Central Kentucky farms on May 21 suggests the worst may be over as far as mare reproductive loss syndrome is concerned. While heavy losses already have been incurred, particularly involving maiden and barren mares bred in February, the good news is that mares bred from late March on appear to be holding their pregnancies at close to normal percentages. Based on the surveys and on the normal distribution of Kentucky foals born between January and June, <i>The Blood-Horse</i> estimates the 2002 Kentucky foal crop will decrease by no more than 21%.

  • An Eye on the Weather

    Tom Priddy, a meteorologist at the University of Kentucky's College of Agriculture, put together data on the weather this spring that is thought to have caused the current equine problems associated with pasture.

  • New Recommendations Issued on Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome

    Based on scientific and diagnostic results available to date, the Kentucky Association of Equine Practitioners has issued the following suggestions for veterinarians to discuss with their clients based on a valid veterinary-client-patient relationship. This is subject to change based on updates from scientific results.