Keyword: Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome

  • With MRLS Outbreak, 2001 Was Year of Loss For Breeding Industry

    The worst health problem to hit the Thoroughbred industry since CEM and EVA occurred during the spring of 2001. What was grouped by the industry under the heading of mare reproductive loss syndrome actually was two reproductive situations. The first was the loss/abortion of late-term or at-term gestations. Some foals were born compromised and later died. The second situation was early fetal loss.

  • With MRLS Outbreak, 2000 Was Year of Loss For Breeding Industry

    The worst health problem to hit the Thoroughbred industry since CEM and EVA occurred during the spring of 2001. What was grouped by the industry under the heading of mare reproductive loss syndrome actually was two reproductive situations. The first was the loss/abortion of late-term or at-term gestations. Some foals were born compromised and later died. The second situation was early fetal loss.

  • Saint Ballado colt brought 2001 top yearling price of $4-million.

    Auction Year in Review: Huge Hit

    North America's Thoroughbred marketplace suffered a big setback in 2001. To put it in perspective, the decline was bigger than anything recorded from the mid-1980s through the early 1990s, when the industry suffered a disastrous slump that sent investors fleeing from the horse business.

  • Tobacco Funds Approved For MRLS Study

    The Kentucky Agriculture Development Board on Friday approved using $311,000 from state and county tobacco-settlement funds to research causes of Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome that resulted in deaths of foals and caused some mares to abort fetuses last spring.

  • Survey Shows Demographic Profile of Central Kentucky Horse Farmers

    Fact or fiction: The typical Central Kentucky Thoroughbred farm owner has a palatial spread, hundreds of horses, and money to burn? According to the results of a demographic survey commissioned by the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association and the Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, it's fiction. The general population, though, may believe it to be true.

  • Farm Bill, With MRLS Provisions, Clears Committee

    Democrats forced a new farm bill through a Senate committee Thursday after giving Southern senators more money for big farms and adding a dairy program that could raise retail milk prices. Provisions for loans that would aid farmers impacted by mare reproductive loss syndrome are included in the bill that cleared the Senate Agriculture Committee.

  • Keeneland January Auction Will Be Smaller

    Keeneland's 2002 January horses of all ages sale will be 30% smaller than it was in 2001. The catalogue has 1,392 lots compared to this year's record total of 1,992. The auction's 2002 edition will run for four days, Jan. 7-10. In 2001, the sale was six days long.

  • MRLS Economic Impact: $336-Million

    More than 30% of the anticipated 2002 Thoroughbred foal crop in Kentucky has been wiped out due to mare reproductive loss syndrome, and the economic cost to the state from losses suffered by all horse breeds will total nearly $336 million, according to a study commissioned by Gov. Paul Patton and conducted by the University of Louisville's Department of Equine Business.

  • Research Expands on Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome

    The Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation and the Commonwealth of Kentucky held a press conference late Sept. 20 to announce that they are splitting the cost of bringing in expert help to look at all of the health problems seen in Kentucky this spring. A team headed by Dr. Noah Cohen of Texas A&M University will look at not only records of aborted fetuses and dead foals sent to the Kentucky Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, but also at records from the two large referral equine practices in Central Kentucky and private practitioners.

  • Research Expands on Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome

    The Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation and the Commonwealth of Kentucky held a press conference late Sept. 20 to announce that they are splitting the cost of bringing in expert help to look at all of the health problems seen in Kentucky this spring. A team headed by Dr. Noah Cohen of Texas A&M University will look at not only records of aborted fetuses and dead foals sent to the Kentucky Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, but also at records from the two large referral equine practices in Central Kentucky and private practitioners.

  • Recommendations Forthcoming From Mare Reproductive Loss Survey

    The survey of 133 Central Kentucky farms was designed to identify risk factors, not causes, of mare reproductive loss syndrome, said Dr. Roberta Dwyer of the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Research Center. As a result of the survey, a list of recommendations will be put forth in the next four to six weeks to help farm managers avoid risk factors in the future.

  • Mare Reproductive Loss Survey Confirms Some Beliefs; Belies Others

    Results from the survey of 133 farms in Central Kentucky regarding the early fetal loss and late-term abortions that occurred this spring substantiated the preliminary ideas held by researchers and veterinarians this spring. The survey also put to rest some fears of causes put forth by individuals in the industry. It is perhaps this second result that makes the survey good news for horse owners.

  • Study: Growth Rates Not Affected by MRLS

    While mare reproductive loss syndrome has had a devastating effect on in-foal mares in 2001, a just-released study indicates it had no affect on the growth rate of foals of 2000 and 2001 raised on Central Kentucky farms and foals of 2001.

  • Grayson-Jockey Club Partners With State in Research Effort

    The Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation will partner with the state of Kentucky in funding a research project on Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome (MRLS). The Foundation committed $56,400 as an equal partner with the state.

  • Vets Following Progress of Pregnant Mares in Kentucky

    Several reproductive specialists at Hagyard-Davidson-McGee veterinary firm in Lexington, Ky., are following about 100 pregnant mares. These are mares from farms which were either affected or unaffected by Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome this spring; are 15 years old or younger; were bred March 15 or earlier; and are not going through the sales and will remain in Kentucky to foal next spring.

  • Jockey Club Estimates 20 Percent Pregnancy Loss in Kentucky

    In releasing its projected figures for the 2002 North American registered Thoroughbred foal crop, The Jockey Club estimates that 20 percent of mares in Kentucky lost their pregnancies due to Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome last spring.

  • Tobacco Money to Help Offset Foal Loss Syndrome Study Cost

    The board dispensing Kentucky's portion of tobacco settlement money has approved a $56,400 grant to cover half of the cost of the investigation into the Mare Reproductive Foal Loss Syndrome that negatively impacted the horse breeding industry last spring.

  • Farm Bill Has Foal-Loss Impact Provision

    Language that calls for low-interest loans for owners and breeders impacted by mare reproductive loss syndrome is included in a farm bill now under consideration by the House Agriculture Committee. The bill may be ready the week of July 30.

  • First KRC Informational Hearing to be July 24

    The first in a series of three Kentucky Racing Commission informational hearings on the state of Kentucky's horse racing and breeding industry will be held Tuesday, July 24 in Fort Mitchell, Ky.

  • Latest Foal Loss Update Shows No Change in Risk Factors

    In the latest update on Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome, researchers at the University of Kentucky report the evidence continues to point toward cherry trees and a caterpillar infestation this spring as the likely causes of the problem.

  • Kentucky to Address State of Industry at Hearings

    With the horse racing and breeding industries in the Bluegrass State facing several challenges, the Kentucky Racing Commission has scheduled three hearings this summer to facilitate dialogue on the issues. It's far too early, though, to determine whether the meetings will lead to, or are even designed to devise, a cohesive legislative agenda.

  • With stallion Old Trieste in the foreground, Kentucky state Rep. Carolyn Belcher, left, and state Sen. Joey Pendleton, center, listen to Jonabell Farm president Jimmy Bell, right.

    Kentucky Legislators Tour Affected Farms

    As Central Kentucky breeders and owners prepare for the "ripple effect" from mare reproductive loss syndrome, Kentucky legislators are in the process of gathering information to assess the damage. Meanwhile, a state equine emergency management plan is in the works.

  • Stallion-Season Market Not Immune to Crisis

    Uncertainty stemming from mare reproductive loss syndrome, and the subsequent moratorium on prospective foal insurance that has been in effect since early May, are expected to impact the no-guarantee stallion-season market in 2002.

  • Michelle LeBlanc, veterinarian, discussed mare reproductivity at farm managers meeting.

    Mare Reproductivity a Timely Topic at Farm Managers Meeting

    The timing couldn't have been better, but it certainly wasn't planned. On April 30, the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Manager's Club invited an equine reproductive specialist to speak at its June meeting. The following week, Central Kentucky was gripped by mare reproductive loss syndrome.

  • Veterinarian Sheds Light on Cloudy Fetal Fluids

    A Kentucky veterinarian who specializes in mare reproduction, fetal ultrasound, and fetal sexing has studied pregnancy videos 1996 and 1998 and foal production the following years and has found that some degree of cloudiness in chorionic or amnionic fluid did not necessarily mean the mare would lose her foal or she would have an abnormal foal.

  • Epidemiologic Teams Begin Survey Work

    The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture posted the following information on its web site at http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/VetScience/mrls/brief529.htm :

  • Jay Hickey, American Horse Council president.

    Foal-Loss Legislation Prepared by Industry

    The National Thoroughbred Racing Association and the American Horse Council have prepared legislation they hope is introduced by Kentucky Sens. Jim Bunning and Mitch McConnell when Congress reconvenes June 4.

  • Latest Twist in Foal Loss Syndrome: Mycotoxins Out, Cyanide In

    No longer does the mysterious Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome appear to be the result of incredibly high mycotoxin levels in pasture grasses; now the most likely cause appears to be cyanide brought onto pastures from wild black cherry trees, carried by Eastern tent caterpillars.

  • Dr. Thomas Tobin, speaking to Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome forum Thursday.

    Researchers Zero In on Cyanide as Cause of Foal Loss Syndrome

    Researchers at the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Center have made significant progress in their quest to find the cause of the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome. According to reports presented Thursday during an informational forum at Keeneland, black cherry trees located in close proximity to horse pastures are the primary source of the cyanide that was detected in tests of dead foals and fetuses from mares that aborted.