Keyword: Kentucky Thoroughbred Association

  • Derby, Oaks Signal Rights Debated

    Horsemen at odds with TrackNet Media Group over advance deposit wagering revenue sharing plans are proposing an arrangement that would allow all ADWs to carry programs of both the May 2 Kentucky Oaks (gr. I) and May 3 Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I).

  • Churchill Downs

    Horsemen Won't OK Churchill ADW Signal

    Consider this chilling scenario: Customers of several advance deposit wagering companies - and possibly some large off-shore rebate shops - won't be able to place wagers on the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) through those entities.

  • KEEP Plans Rally for Casino Bill

    In an attempt to recruit people to support the proposed constitutional amendment for expanded gaming, the Kentucky Equine Education Project urged its members to attend a Feb. 26 committee meeting hearing for the bill, as well as a horse trailer caravan "rally" the same day in Frankfort.

  • KTA and Turfway Park Award Scholarships

    Ten college and university students got lucky at the races Sept. 30, each winning $1,000 in scholarship funds from Turfway Park and the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association. The scholarship giveaway was part of Turfway's Kentucky Cup Day of Champions.

  • Farmer Honored with William T. Young Humanitarian Award

    Tracy Farmer has received the third annual William T. Young Humanitarian Award from the Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders. The award was established in 2003 to recognize a person in the thoroughbred industry "who recognizes and promotes the human endeavor," was presented at the annual Kentucky Derby trainers' dinner Tuesday night.

  • Kentucky Farm Managers Favor International Incentive Plan

    Members of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers Club overwhelmingly favor a state breeders' incentive program that would reward breeders of Kentucky-bred and Kentucky-foaled horses that win anywhere in the world.

  • Keeneland/KTA Host College Scholarship Day

    Keeneland and the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association are teaming up to present College Scholarship Day on spring meet opening day, April 8, in which college students can win $1,000 toward their education, as well as additional gift certificates to local Lexington businesses.

  • Jones Tells Farm Managers Common Sense Will Work

    Former Kentucky governor and Airdrie Stud owner Brereton Jones told the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers Club Jan. 4 that a common sense approach and a united front would get things accomplished in Frankfort, including the creation of breeders' rewards program.

  • Keeneland Scholarship Day Oct. 15

    The annual Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Keeneland Association Scholarship day is set for Oct. 15. College students can register to win one-of- 10-$1,000 scholarships to be used toward their education.

  • KTA Contributes $100,000 to Support KEEP

    The Kentucky Equine Education Project received another vote of confidence June 4 when the board of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders contributed $100,000 to KEEP, which was launched in early May.

  • Mineshaft Heads Kentucky-Bred Champions

    Mineshaft, the nation's 2003 Horse of the Year and champion older male, and his dam, Prospectors Delite, headlined the award winners honored April 15 at Keeneland by the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders.

  • Ray Paulick<br>Editor-in-Chief

    Groundhog Day

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Kentucky legislators can't learn everything about the horse business in the few weeks that remain before the session deadline to file bills. It requires professional lobbyists, but it also takes commitment from the rank and file.

  • Process of Educating Kentucky Legislators Begins

    With an economic impact pegged at about $3.4 billion, the equine industry has been called the most important in Kentucky. Some legislators would like to keep it healthy--even help it grow--but they've acknowledged they don't have all the answers.

  • Graduating Students Can Win at Churchill

    Ten monetary awards worth $1,000 each will be given away by random drawing to graduating high school seniors and college students in attendance at Churchill Downs on Sunday as the track joins with the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association to present the annual "KTA Scholarship Day."

  • Kentucky Plans Equine Reproductive Health Monitoring System

    Kentucky's horse industry is proceeding with a plan to develop a computerized equine reproductive health monitoring system at the University of Kentucky's Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center (LDDC) after hearing and approving a proposal Monday from a Virginia-based epidemiologist.

  • A mare and her healthy foal in a paddock on a Lexington farm. May 9, 2001

Photo by anne M. Eberhardt

    Central Kentucky Abortion Rate Appears Normal

    Mid-gestation abortions have generated concern in Central Kentucky, but according to officials, the 50 fetuses received in the last five months by Kentucky's Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center in Lexington do not represent a significant increase over past years.

  • Kentucky Seeks Economic Impact Study

    No one in Kentucky knows exactly how many horses or farms make up what is now the state's number one agricultural industry, but the Kentucky Department of Agriculture, in partnership with some of the state's equine leaders, hopes to change that.

  • KTA Sets Meeting for MRLS Loan Applicants

    The Kentucky Thoroughbred Association will offer a seminar July 25 to assist breeders in filling out loan applications for funding tied to mare reproductive loss syndrome. The money is available through a federal law enacted in 2001.

  • Kentucky Horsemen Briefed on Gaming Legislation

    Kentucky horsemen were urged Feb. 27 to participate in a grass-roots campaign to contact legislators and urge them to support legislation that would authorize electronic gaming devices at the state's eight racetracks. The bill was introduced in the House of Representatives Feb. 26.

  • Tracks, Horsemen Agree on Splits in Kentucky

    Kentucky's Thoroughbred racetracks and horsemen's associations apparently struck a deal the week of Jan. 21 on revenue splits that will lead to alternative-gaming legislation. Under the plan, the state, not the racetracks, would get the lion's share of revenue from track-based slot machines or video lottery terminals.

  • Kentucky Horsemen Near Consensus on Slot Revenue Splits

    The chances of alternative gaming at Kentucky racetracks will lie in the hands of lawmakers, but as of mid-January, racetrack officials and horsemen's groups were said to be close to agreement on revenue splits, a crucial component of any legislation that may be introduced.

  • Survey Shows Demographic Profile of Central Kentucky Horse Farmers

    Fact or fiction: The typical Central Kentucky Thoroughbred farm owner has a palatial spread, hundreds of horses, and money to burn? According to the results of a demographic survey commissioned by the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association and the Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, it's fiction. The general population, though, may believe it to be true.

  • With stallion Old Trieste in the foreground, Kentucky state Rep. Carolyn Belcher, left, and state Sen. Joey Pendleton, center, listen to Jonabell Farm president Jimmy Bell, right.

    Kentucky Legislators Tour Affected Farms

    As Central Kentucky breeders and owners prepare for the "ripple effect" from mare reproductive loss syndrome, Kentucky legislators are in the process of gathering information to assess the damage. Meanwhile, a state equine emergency management plan is in the works.

  • Many Kentucky Mares Now Holding Pregnancies at Normal Rate; Impact Seen at 21% of Crop

    An informal survey of Central Kentucky farms on May 21 suggests the worst may be over as far as mare reproductive loss syndrome is concerned. While heavy losses already have been incurred, particularly involving maiden and barren mares bred in February, the good news is that mares bred from late March on appear to be holding their pregnancies at close to normal percentages. Based on the surveys and on the normal distribution of Kentucky foals born between January and June, <i>The Blood-Horse</i> estimates the 2002 Kentucky foal crop will decrease by no more than 21%.

  • KTA/KTOB Elects Board of Directors

    Though officers remain the same, there are several new members of the board of the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association/Kentucky Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders, which recently held its election.