Keyword: health watch

  • Choke

    Choke is the most common disorder involving the esophagus in horses. Horses can become choked on many different substances, most commonly grain or hay, but also beet pulp, corn cobs, and apples.

  • Dealing with Twins

    Twins occur a little more commonly in the Thoroughbred than in other breeds. Approximately 20% of ovulations in Thoroughbred mares are double ovulations.

  • Bleeding

    Scientists at the University of California-Davis have uncovered new information that might explain why horses bleed internally when they exercise.

  • West Nile Virus Update

    The National Veterinary Services Laboratory recently confirmed two additional equine clinical cases of West Nile virus (WNV), one in New Jersey and the other in New York. The New Jersey case involved a 4-month-old colt, the youngest horse ever known to have developed clinical illness due to WNV in the U.S.

  • Safe Delivery Tips

    Most equine births are uneventful, but there are some steps you can take to make sure your mare's labor and delivery are safe and successful.

  • Morris Grants Fund New Research

    The Morris Animal Foundation is funding 14 new equine health studies during its 2001 fiscal year that will focus on colic, digestive tract disorders, foal diseases, genetics, infectious diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, pain management, and surgery.

  • Supplement Use Complicated

    Different workloads, stages of growth, pregnancy, and lactation require different dietary configurations for the horse. To meet those needs, horse owners often want to use supplements. However, you should realize that supplements could cause more problems than they solve, writes Dr. Joseph J. Bertone in the February edition of <i>The Horse</i>.

  • Imprinting Controversy

    If imprinting is done correctly, a foal will be much less likely to resist such things as shoeing and having its ears clipped. However, there are some equine behaviorists and veterinarians who aren't convinced that the procedure is a good idea in theory, or in practice.

  • West Nile Virus Update

    Researchers at the United States Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., recently discovered that West Nile virus can be passed from bird to bird in a laboratory setting without the bite of a mosquito.

  • Suspensory Disease Common in Equine Athletes

    Proximal suspensory desmitis is a common injury in equine athletes. It can affect both the front limbs and the hindlimbs, but it is most often seen in the front legs of Thoroughbred racehorses, according to Dr. Rick Arthur, a veterinarian who practices at Southern California tracks.

  • AAEP Preview

    The results of a landmark, three-year study on radiographic changes in Thoroughbred yearlings will be presented during the American Association of Equine Practitioners annual convention.

  • Not All Horses Benefit from Going Barefoot

    In a well-conformed, well-built horse, the barefoot state is the most natural situation and probably the healthiest, depending on the work the horse is asked to do. But taking the shoes off a horse and leaving them off is not a good idea for every animal.