Keyword: Gluck

  • Prominent Retired Trainer John Campo Sr. Dead

    Retired trainer John Campo Sr., who conditioned champions Pleasant Colony, Protagonist, and Talking Picture, died Nov. 14 due to declining health over the past several years.

  • Mandella's Mentor, Lefty Nickerson, Dead

    Retired New York trainer V.J. "Lefty" Nickerson, a huge influence on the career of Hall of Fame conditioner Richard Mandella, died March 26 in his sleep at his Smithtown, N.Y., home.

  • 2002 Abortions Termed 'Fall Fetal Loss Syndrome'

    The results of a survey conducted by the Gluck Equine Research Center showed that a small number of Central Kentucky farms experienced an unusual increase in what is being termed fall fetal loss syndrome (FFLS) during the latter part of 2002.

  • So Far, So Good as Breeding Season Nears

    Thoroughbred owners and breeders in Central Kentucky are on high alert for signs or symptoms of mare reproductive loss syndrome, but, as of late January, they were preparing for the 2002 breeding season with a "business as usual" approach. The season traditionally begins Feb. 15.

  • The Blood-Horse to Support MRLS Research

    In an effort to show support for industry horse owners and breeders, The Blood-Horse, Inc., announced yesterday it will contribute a portion of its advertising revenues for the remainder of 2001 to the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky, to support further research into the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome that is currently plaguing the Thoroughbred industry.

  • The Blood-Horse to Support MRLS Research

    In an effort to show support for industry horse owners and breeders, The Blood-Horse, Inc., announced yesterday it will contribute a portion of its advertising revenues for the remainder of 2001 to the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky, to support further research into the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome that is currently plaguing the Thoroughbred industry.

  • Researchers Unite to Search for Cause of Crisis

    Over and over the refrain has been heard for the past two weeks--the horse industry is lucky to have the equine expertise concentrated in Central Kentucky, especially during this time of all-out war against an unknown killer. Dr. Roger Murphy, president of the Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association and the Kentucky Association of Equine Practitioners, opened the informational meeting the evening of May 10 with the statement: "I'm proud to be a part of an industry that can unify in the face of adversity."