Keyword: Dr. Mary Scollay

  • The initial focus of screening limits will be substances commonly used in horses

    KY EDRC Backs Screening Limits for Some Substances

    The Kentucky Equine Drug Research Council has adopted a statement supporting screening limits at drug-testing laboratories as a result of the proliferation of irrelevant substances that have shown up at low levels in equine drug tests.

  • Suddenbreakingnews at Churchill Downs

    The Twisting Tale of Suddenbreakingnews

    Suddenbreakingnews, a Belmont Stakes (gr. I) contender who recently had his sex status changed from gelding to ridgling, might still be considered a gelding had he not contested any of the Triple Crown races.

  • Kentucky Derby 142 trophy

    Drug Tests Clear for Derby, Oaks Horses

    According to the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, all participants in this year’s Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands and Longines Kentucky Oaks (gr. I) have tested negative for any prohibited substances.

  • Thoroughbred Horse Racing

    Equine Fatality Rate Down 14% in 2015

    Equine Injury Database statistics show the rate of fatal injuries in Thoroughbred races dropped 14% in 2015 from the previous year. The overall rate is the lowest since the stats were first reported in 2009.

  • Dr Laura Kennedy

    KY Necropsy Program Disproves 'Bad Step' Myth

    The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission necropsy program is continuing to provide evidence that many racehorses that suffer catastrophic injuries often have pre-existing conditions that lead to breakdowns.

  • 2014 Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit.

    No Consensus on Fewer Starts, Shorter Fields

    A panel discussion during the first day of the Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit yielded no consensus on possible reasons for declines in average starts per horse and average field sizes over the past five decades.

  • Welfare & Safety of the Racehorse Summit.

    Identifying At-Risk Racehorses a Priority

    As the North American Thoroughbred industry continues its quest to lower the catastrophic breakdown rate, it is actively pushing the need to identify at-risk racehorses, even if the effort makes stakeholders uncomfortable.

  • Turfway Park

    KHRC Drug Tests: Turfway Meet 'Cleanest'

    A horsemen's meeting on upcoming equine medication changes in Kentucky revealed some interesting information: The four months of racing at Turfway Park are the "cleanest" in the state according to drug-testing results.

  • Use of Calming Agent in Racehorses Examined

    The horse racing industry is taking a closer look at a relaxant that produces optimum results when administered within a few hours of a race. The prevalence of GABA, a supplement, is open to speculation.

  • John Veitch

    Conway: KHRC Withheld Information on Veitch

    A member of the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission said a key piece of information was withheld from commissioners when they voted last year to suspend former chief state steward John Veitch for a year.

  • On call veterinarian Larry Bramlage looks over horses on Kentucky Oaks Day.

    Derby Vets Ensure Safety for the Horses

    The goal of these vets is to keep a close eye on hopefuls', and then contenders', conditions, catching any lump, misstep, or hint of malaise that could compromise performance ability in the days prior to the big race.

  • Panel to Investigate Aqueduct Breakdowns

    Leading veterinarians and a Hall of Fame jockey will be among those studying the 20 fatal breakdowns of horses racing at Aqueduct Racetrack since December, New York officials announced March 22.

  • Kentucky Purse Regulation Will Be Reviewed

    The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission will review a regulation that permits tracks to withhold all purses from a day of racing when there is a suspicious post-race test for any horse racing that day.

  • Salix

    Little Opposition to KY Drug Rule Changes

    If the tepid response at an Oct. 10 meeting at Keeneland is any indication, horsemen have little or no opposition to stiffer medication guidelines being considered by the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission.

  • Breakdown at Penn National May Lead to Reform

    The lack of quick veterinary attention for a filly that suffered a catastrophic breakdown during training at Penn National Sept. 18 could lead to required veterinary care during training hours at racetracks.

  • KY Drug Council Targets Corticosteroids

    The Kentucky Drug Equine Research Council, citing a need to explore use of corticosteroids in racehorses, agreed Feb. 9 to take bids for research into one of the drugs in the research planning phase.

  • Life At Ten Probe Ongoing; Drug Tests Done

    The Kentucky Horse Racing Commission Feb. 9 offered no timeline for the ongoing probe into Life At Ten's performance in the 2010 Breeders' Cup Ladies' Classic, though there was public acknowledgment of drug testing.

  • Data: Fatalities Similar Across All Surfaces

    An initial analysis of equine injury data released earlier this year shows no statistically significant difference in the risk of fatalities in Thoroughbreds on different racing surfaces, officials said June 28.

  • Equine Injury Data Called Critical to Racing

    The Jockey Club Equine Injury Database has compiled statistics over a 12-month period for 84% of all flat racing in North America, but now comes the process of analyzing the data in an attempt to quantify the results.

  • RCI Conference to Discuss Equine Health

    The Association of Racing Commissioners International will celebrate its 75th anniversary when its four-day conference on racing and wagering integrity kicks off April 20 at the Lexington Hilton Downtown Hotel and Conference Center.

  • 'On Call' Veterinarians Show Support

    Now in its 19th year, the American Association of Equine Practitioners' "On Call" program will assist the spring season of live Thoroughbred racing on major television networks. The role of the "On Call" veterinarian is to deliver accurate veterinary information to broadcast and print journalists regarding the health of the equine athlete.

  • Vet Leaves; Scollay Has Added Duties

    Dr. Mary Scollay, equine medical director for the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission, will temporarily serve as chief racing veterinarian in Kentucky with the departure of Dr. Lafe Nichols.

  • KY Drug-Testing Lab Still a Possibility

    The Governor's Task Force on the Future of Horse Racing hopes to have the framework for a plan to create an equine drug-testing laboratory in Kentucky in place by the end of this year.

  • KY Officials Vow to Regulate Steroids

    Kentucky racing officials said they intend on having regulations for use of anabolic steroids in racehorses in place as quickly as possible, but discussion and research are still needed.

  • Dr. Patricia Marquis

    Marquis Named Calder Vet

    Dr. Patricia Maquis was named senior track veterinarian at Calder Race Course. Dr. Marquis replaces Dr. Mary Scollay who took the position of equine medical director at the Kentucky Horse Racing Authority

  • Eight Belles

    Catastrophic Injuries: What Do We Know?

    In the wake of two highly publicized catastrophic racetrack injuries since May 2006, questions and opinions regarding the safety of Thoroughbred racehorses have been generated and propagated by fans, the media, and animal rights groups.

  • The Jockey Club underwrote the summit where the study's numbers were released.

    Review: Racetrack Fatality Ratio Changes

    The number of catastrophic injuries on dirt tracks has gone up while the corresponding number on synthetic surfaces has gone down, according to a revision of a report first given at the March 17 Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit.

  • Caution Urged on Steroid Regulation

    An authority on drug testing who has worked with the United States Olympic Committee and is now advising the horse racing industry has urged caution on efforts to regulate anabolic steroids.

  • Welfare and Safety Summit Approaching

    The second Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit, slated for March 17-18 at Keeneland, will be a time of learning new approaches to solving industry issues, as well as continuing the discussion of progress on topics brought up at the first meeting in October 2006.