Keyword: Discipline-Specific Issues

  • Catastrophic Equine Injuries' Impact on Jockey Injuries

    Any rider that's ever hit the ground knows that horseback riding can be unforgiving. But imagine your mount, running just feet in front of another horse, falling out from underneath you at upwards of 30 miles per hour. That's the reality jockeys face on a daily basis.

  • Study: Epistaxis Has 'Complex Hereditary Basis'

    Researchers have determined that epistaxis—the most severe form of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) in which blood runs from the horse’s nostrils—has a genetic basis. And, according to a group from Australia, a combination of genes as well as exterior influences can lead to epistaxis.

  • Researchers Examine Fatal Lumbar Vertebral Fractures

    When it comes to catastrophic injuries in racehorses, most people immediately think of severe limb fractures. But these athletes sometimes suffer life-threatening fractures beyond the limbs. Lumbar vertebral fractures, for instance, can occur in the loin area near where the rear of the saddle sits.

  • Preventing Injuries in Thoroughbred Racehorses

    The big names are recognizable: Barbaro, Eight Belles, St Nicholas Abbey. But hundreds of other racehorses have suffered racing or training injuries that ultimately proved fatal, as well. And while everyone would like to see the number of catastrophic injuries that occur on racetracks reduced, finding ways to actually accomplish that is easier said than d...

  • Check Ligament Surgery Helps Racehorses with SDFT Injuries

    Moderate to severe superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendon lesions in Thoroughbred racehorses have typically carried a poor prognosis for a return to racing and a lengthy rehabilitation process for horses that do return. But a team of veterinarians recently took a closer look at a procedure that could help improve the outcome for Thoroughbreds with such i...

  • Risk Factors for EIPH in Australian Racehorses Studied

    Researchers know that exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, or EIPH, can hinder a horse's lung function and athletic performance. What they're still not clear on, however, is which horses will bleed and when. But an Australian research team recently took a step closer to finding the answer.

  • The Thoroughbred Racehorse Foot

    Foot problems can commonly cause horses to be scratched from a race, lose training days, overload other structures, and have shortened careers. Functionally adapted for speed and efficient use of energy, the Thoroughbred foot is light and lacks the mass for protection commonly seen in heavier boned breeds.

  • Study: Tongue Ties Appear to Benefit Racehorses

    For more than a century, racehorse trainers have tied horses’ tongues to the front and side when they work or race. The purpose, trainers say, is to reduce breathing noises and help the horses perform better. But, until now, researchers have never confirmed that the tongue tie actually has a physical effect on the upper respiratory structures.

  • CHRB Begins Cobalt Testing

    The California Horse Racing Board (CHRB) has started evaluating cobalt levels in racehorses competing at tracks in that state and in certain necropsy scenarios, according to a March 4 memo from CHRB Equine Medical Director Rick Arthur, DVM.

  • Saddle Fit Can be a Problem for Racehorses

    Both sport and pleasure riders know how important saddle fit is to keeping their mounts healthy and comfortable. But what effects could considerably smaller and lighter racing saddles have on horses that are traveling considerably faster than the average reiner or jumper? Turns out these tiny pieces of tack can have a substantial impact.

  • No Additional Signs of EHV-1 at Fair Hill

    The horse quarantined with a suspect case of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) at the Fair Hill Training Center, in Elkton, Md., will be retested next week, according to a statement from Kathleen Anderson, DVM, owner and manager of the Elkton-based Equine Veterinary Care, PC.

  • High-Speed Exercise and Bone Response

    Bone was once considered an inert material with its structure defined by genetics. But it turns out there’s a lot more at work, explained Larry Bramlage, DVM, MS, Dipl. ACVS: “Selective breeding dictates the initial skeleton, but adaptive training in response to exercise modifies it further.” He and other racehorse surgeons are striving ...

  • Managing Racehorse Joints with Strict Medication Regulations

    In the face of new racing medication rules, veterinarians are revisiting treatment approaches for injured animals on layup that trainers hope to send back to the track soon. At the American Association of Equine Practitioners' Convention, held Dec. 7-11 in Nashville, Tenn., Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD, Dipl. ACVS, ACVSMR, described how these restricti...

  • Managing Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Racehorses

    Racehorses must be healthy and at their peak fitness to be successful. One commonly combated health condition—exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, or EIPH—can be performance-limiting and even deadly among these athletes. And as racehorse medication reform has taken center stage in recent years, the racing world has been rife with controversy...

  • Researchers Study Sesamoid Bone Shape Differences

    The training and racing of 2-year-old Thoroughbreds has always been a source of debate in the racing world due to concerns that exerting young skeletons might make horses more likely to injure themselves. But recent study results from Italian researchers suggest that at least one set of bones in Thoroughbreds might not impacted by training as juveniles: t...

  • Researchers Study Racehorses' Bone Fatigue Life

    When you buy a new horse trailer, chances are you'll also get lots technical information about the “fatigue life” of mechanical parts like the shocks or the clamp to close the hitch. That fatigue life refers to how long these parts can be used—opening and closing, absorbing shock, clamping, or whatever they do—before they break.

  • AAEP On Call Vets to Support 2013 Breeders' Cup Races

    Equine veterinarians representing the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ (AAEP) On Call program will assist NBC Sports with horse health information during the Nov. 1–2 Breeders’ Cup World Thoroughbred Championships at Santa Anita Park, in Arcadia, Calif.

  • Researchers Study Abnormal Behavior Prevalence in Racehorses

    Many horse owners don't think about equine stereotypic behaviors until they own a cribber, a stall walker, a weaver, or a horse that passes his time with any abnormal behavior. But these stereotypies are more important than some might think: They could indicate compromised equine welfare. Recently, Chilean researchers set out to evaluate the prevalenc...

  • Study: Some Wobbler-Affected Thoroughbreds Can Race

    Cervical vertebral malformation (CVM) is considered, by some, a diagnosis that leaves a horse with little hope of an athletic career. But according to recent study results, some carefully managed CVM horses could have a productive future ahead of them, after all.