Horse Health

Health news, veterinary advice, and educational tools to keep your horse healthy.

  • Conformation of Racehorses

    "Forelimb conformation receives lots of attention because of perceived predisposition to injury (with various conformational problems)," began Liz Santschi, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, clinical associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, at the Western Veterinary Conference held Feb. 20-25 in Las Vegas, Nev.

  • Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Horses

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy might be most easily recognized as the technology used to treat the "bends" or decompression sickness in divers.

  • Cold Air and Lung Health

    Researchers at Oklahoma State University (OSU) recently completed a study on airway cooling and mucosal injury during cold weather exercise. Using the Thoroughbred racehorse as a model, scientists found that even cantering in sub-freezing temperatures can induce airway obstruction (bronchoconstriction, or airway contraction). The research appeared in the ...

  • Churchill Lifts Ban on Florida Horses; Some Restrictions Remain

    Churchill Downs has ended its halt to shipments of horses from three Florida facilities where possible cases of the equine bacterial disease strangles had been reported, although restrictions remain for horses that have been housed in quarantined or restricted barns at those tracks and training centers.

  • CHRB Issues Policy on Florida Shippers

    Responding to the presence of the bacterial infection strangles among racehorses in Florida, the California Horse Racing Board, in conjunction with the state's racetracks, has established a policy setting health requirements for horses being shipped from Florida to California.

  • Breeding Efficiency in Kentucky Thoroughbred Mares

    <P>Management and veterinary care are important factors that contribute to the overall pregnancy rate of the Thoroughbred mare, said Karin Bosh, a graduate research assistant in the University of Kentucky's Department of Veterinary Science. Bosh presented research supporting the link at the university's Gluck Equine Research Center on Feb. 8. <P>"It cos...

  • Keeneland to Host Forum on Strangles

    Keeneland Association is hosting an information meeting on Thursday, March 31, regarding recent cases of strangles in South Florida and at Churchill Downs' Trackside training center in Louisville, Ky.

  • Precautions Taken to Prevent Strangles Spread

    Though cases of strangles at Palm Meadows Training Center in South Florida appear to have been confined, the five positive tests for the equine bacterial infection set in motion a chain of events up and down the East Coast.

  • Forelimb Conformation and the Thoroughbred Racehorse

    <P>"What is the relationship between conformation and performance, and what can we do to impact it?" These questions have been asked by those focused on performance in many species, and they were the focus of one presentation by Liz Santschi, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, clinical associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, at the Western Veterinary Co...

  • Drug Testing

    <P>Controversy over medication and drug testing has been around since organized equine competitions came into being. There has always been more disagreement than agreement among the various factions involved, and more contention than harmony. Drug testing is a legal part of nearly all breed and discipline competitions these days, and much of what is done ...

  • Conformation Development in Growing Thoroughbreds

    Selection of Thoroughbred horses for racing and breeding is based primarily on equine performance, pedigree, and phenotype (physical characteristics). Although conformation plays a critical role in the evaluation of horses, current methods of analyzing equine conformation are largely subjective and vary according to personal opinion and individual experie...

  • Fractures in Thoroughbred Racehorses

    <P>Musculoskeletal injury is the most common cause of lost training days for Thoroughbred racehorses. This type of injury, particularly fractures, is also cited as a major reason horses leave the industry. But the incidence and characteristics of fractures in racing Thoroughbreds are not well understood. <P>Characterizing fractures was the aim of Kristi...

  • EVA Case Detected in United Kingdom

    The United Kingdom's Department for the Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs announced Dec. 17 that it imposed restrictions on Oct. 29 on a 5-year-old stallion on a premises in the Newmarket area of Suffolk following a positive blood test result for equine viral arteritis.

  • AAEP to Host Summit on Unwanted Horses

    The American Association of Equine Practitioners has announced plans to host an Unwanted Horse Summit. The summit, a one-day conference bringing equine industry leaders together to address the problem of unwanted horses, will take place Tuesday, April 19, 2005, during the American Horse Council's annual meeting in Washington, D.C.

  • AAEP Vets Discuss Pre-Purchase Exams

    The Dec. 5 open forum discussion of pre-purchase exams at sales at the American Association of Equine Practitioners convention in Denver covered several topics critical to consignors, buyers, and veterinarians.

  • Veterinarians Probe Mysterious Disease in Australia

    Reports have been circulating that there is a disease similar to mare reproductive loss syndrome occurring in Australia. Dr. Nigel Perkins of the private consulting firm AusVet Animal Health Services has termed it equine amnionitis and fetal loss (EAFL).Additional information was released Dec. 1 by the Hunter Valley Equine Research Centre, a research facility adjacent to Scone racetrack in the heart of the Australian breeding area, concerning a problem that is causing sporadic abortions throughout the area in mid- to late-term pregnancies.

  • The Golden Age of Horse Health

    The American Association of Equine Practitioners is celebrating its golden anniversary in 2004, and will hold its 50th annual convention in Denver, Colo., Dec. 4-8. The AAEP was founded in December 1954, in Louisville, Ky., by 11 charter members and now boasts approximately 8,000 members in 57 countries. Based on past conference attendance averages, some 2,700 veterinarians, veterinary students, and technicians will be there, while guests and exhibitors in the trade show that accompanies the conference will bring the grand total to about 5,500.

  • Byars to Leave Hagyard-Davidson-McGee

    Dr. T. Douglas Byars, a senior medicine clinician, has announced he will end his 22-year tenure with Hagyard-Davidson-McGee Associates in January 2005.

  • Rutgers' 'Science Update' Scheduled for Dec. 7

    The Rutgers Equine Science Center's Annual "Science Update" will take place from 6-9 p.m. (ET) on Tuesday, Dec. 7, at the New Jersey Museum of Agriculture on the Cook College campus of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in Brunswick, N. J.

  • USDA Moves Step Closer to National Animal ID System

    The American Horse Council reports that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has taken another step toward the implementation of the National Animal Identification System to trace animal movements in case of a major disease outbreak.

  • A Sound Plan: <i>Focus on equine joint health</i>

    New joint product development is being driven by an increased awareness of the need to treat joints without hurting the stomach--that is, without causing gastric ulcers. In June 2004, a product that delivers the strength of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) in a topical cream formulation was approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating joint pain and inflammation in horses. Its name is Surpass Topical Anti-Inflammatory Cream. This new product and others for treating equine joints will be covered here.

  • Inner Peace: <i>Treating and preventing gastric ulcers</i>

    A new product for preventing gastric ulcers in horses is due for release by the end of this year, when Ulcergard joins GastroGard as the second product approved by the federal Food and Drug Administration for ulcer management in the horse. On the more distant horizon, new developments in musculoskeletal pain management that are gentle on the stomach might one day arrive on the equine market, and that too could help prevent ulcers in racehorses.

  • New York Woman Charged in 'Horse Rescue' Case

    New York State Police have charged a former part-time Emergency Medical Technician at Finger Lakes Racetrack in connection with a scheme to defraud horse owners by telling them she would take their horses and find safe homes for them.

  • Equine Protection Group to Have Presence at Breeders' Cup

    The Fund for Horses, a Texas-based group dedicated to the protection of the country's equine population, will have an informational table at Lone Star Park on Breeders' Cup World Thoroughbred Championships Day, Saturday, Oct. 30, as well as on the previous two days.

  • Kentucky Horse Park, Georgetown College Partner on Equine Program

    The Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, Ky. has entered into a partnership with nearby Georgetown College in an effort to provide what is described as "an exceptional learning experience" for students enrolled in the school's newly designed Equine Scholars Program.

  • Efficacy of Common Anti-Ulcer Medications in Racehorses

    <P>Gastric ulcers are so common in racing horses that many equine practitioners maintain their racing patients on anti-ulcer medications to prevent and treat gastric ulcers. Reports in the literature place the percentage of racing horses in training with endoscopically visible gastric ulcers at grater than 80%. Unfortunately, despite the variety of anti-u...

  • Cardiologist Dr. John Gurley works on the foal being held by Tara Spach. Ultrasound screen in foreground shows the foal&#39;s heart and the colored area highlights the defect.

    Vet, Cardiologist Look at Foal's Heart

    A human interventional cardiologist and an equine veterinarian in Lexington, Ky. have successfully completed the first step of a landmark procedure to repair a heart problem called a –ventricular septal defect” in a foal. The procedure was performed July 9.

  • Kentucky Alters Rules in Connection With VS Cases

    Kentucky has altered it regulations concerning vesicular stomatitis in the wake of new cases in Colorado. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture issued a release July 6 that said animals at three properties in Las Animas County and one property in Douglas County have been diagnosed with VS.

  • Breeders' Cup, Lone Star Park Moving Ahead With Plans

    Breeders' Cup, which has plans to set up a "disease-free zone" to allow horses to ship in and out of Lone Star Park, is moving full-steam ahead with preparations for this year's World Thoroughbred Championships even as a limited outbreak of vesicular stomatitis continues in Texas.

  • AAEP's Position on H.R. 857

    <i>By Dr. Tom R. Lenz</i> -- Federal legislation to ban the slaughter of horses in the United States for human consumption has become an emotional issue on which some groups within the equine industry can't see eye to eye. Here are the facts regarding the American Association of Equine Practitioners' position on H.R. 857, the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act.

  • Broad Brush Out of Action

    Prominent sire Broad Brush was taken out of stallion service the end of April at Graham J. Beck's Gainesway Farm near Lexington because of a problem with his left front ankle.

  • Britain Taking EVA Precautions

    Mares going from Ireland to Britain are being tested for Equine Viral Arteritis, a practice which has been routine for mares visiting the country from the rest of Europe.

  • Healthwatch: Breakthroughs in Airway Disease & Spinal Injury Treatment

    Until recently, the only sure way of knowing if a horse was free of lower airway disease was through endoscopy, writes Marcia King in the April edition of The Horse. But scientists in England have developed another technique that involves collecting and measuring the amount of hydrogen peroxide in the moisture of the horse's exhaled air.

  • Healthwatch: Research Links Cushing's to Laminitis

    Cushing's disease (CD) has been identified as the most common cause of laminitis among horses seen at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center. Dr. Mark Donaldson, an assistant professor at the university's School of Veterinary Medicine, led the research effort.

  • Conformation And Racing Problems (AAEP 2003)

    Racehorses with specific conformation are more likely to have certain musculoskeletal injuries, according to two recent studies completed at Colorado State University (CSU). At the 2003 American Association of Equine Practitioners&#39; convention, C. Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD, DSc, FRCVS, Dr.medvet (hc), Dipl. ACVS, director of CSU&#39;s Gail Holmes Equ...

  • Diagnosing Respiratory Tract Ulcers

    &quot;Respiratory disease is the second-leading cause of lost training in the Thoroughbred racehorse, second only to musculoskeletal injuries,&quot; said Jeff Blea, DVM, of the Southern California Equine Foundation in Arcadia, Calif., during the 2003 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention. &quot;Endoscopy of the upper respiratory tract pl...