Horse Health

Health news, veterinary advice, and educational tools to keep your horse healthy.

  • TCA Approves $1.75 Million in Grants for 2006

    At its annual board meeting May 13, Thoroughbred Charities of America (TCA) approved grants of $1,750,000 to 136 non-profits, representing equine rescue/retraining, backstretch/jockey, research, education scholarships, and therapeutic riding facilities in 35 states.

  • Nureyev

    A Look Back: Saving Nureyev

    In October 1987, Walmac International and its veterinarians went to extensive lengths to save the life of stallion Nureyev. Those efforts paid off, adding 14 years to the horse's life. When the son of Northern Dancer died this past Oct. 29 at age 24, he had been represented by 130 stakes winners. This article detailing how Nureyev was saved in 1987 was originally published in the Oct. 10, 1987 <i>Blood-Horse</i>.

  • Broken Legs Aren't Death

    A fracture doesn't necessarily mean the death of a loyal companion or promising athlete. Orthopedic techniques have advanced greatly in the human world in the last three decades, and the equine world has moved in step. Technology has progressed so far that many times even the worst of injuries can be repaired.

  • Interval Training: A Better Option?

    <P>Musculoskeletal injury is the main cause of wastage in Thoroughbred racehorses worldwide, with nearly 30% of all fractures being pelvic and tibial stress fractures. California studies in the late 1990s suggested fast work increased the risk of injuries, while Kentucky studies implied high-speed exercise was protective. K.L.P. Verheyen, DVM, MSc, PhD, M...

  • Hoof Cracks: Causes and Repair

    Your horse&#39;s feet are some of the most important structures contributing to his performance ability, and most people do what they can to keep them healthy. Unfortunately, things can and do go wrong with your horse that can cause hoof cracks to form. Maybe he pulled a shoe in the pasture or grabbed his heel during a competition. Perhaps conditions have...

  • MRLS Effects Minimal in Central Florida

    The impact of the deadly mare reproductive loss syndrome has been minimal on central Florida horse farms this year, but experts say steps should be taken to limit future problems in the area's vast equine industry.

  • Geneticists Identify Speed Gene Combination

    Geneticists have disclosed the findings of a six-year study which, as well as discovering discrepancies in the stud book, for the first time details a direct correlation between specific genes and aspects of racing performance in Thoroughbreds.

  • Third MRLS Case Confirmed in Florida; Meeting Set

    An Arabian mare in Marion County, Florida, aborted a 310-day gestation (the foal was born dead) on March 13 that was confirmed as having mare reproductive loss syndrome (MRLS), according to Dr. Dana Zimmel, of the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine.

  • Interval Training: A Better Option for Racehorses?

    Musculoskeletal injury is the main cause of wastage in Thoroughbred racehorses worldwide, with nearly 30% of all fractures being pelvic and tibial stress fractures. Studies in California in the late 1990s suggested fast work increased the risk of injuries, while other studies in Kentucky implied high-speed exercise was protective. K.L.P. Verheyen, DVM, MS...

  • Using GPS to Train Racehorses

    An Australian researcher says he's found a reliable way for trainers to monitor Thoroughbred racehorse fitness using global positioning system (GPS) technology measurements of velocity and heart rate during fast gallop training routines. He presented the study at the 2005 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 3-7, 2005, in Sea...

  • Three Years of Racing Deaths in Australia

    An Australian survey found that euthanasia for catastrophic forelimb injury was the most common Thoroughbred racehorse fatality. Also, sudden death (not as the result of euthanasia) contributed more to racing fatalities than previously thought. Analyzing point-of-death blood samples could help scientists better pinpoint the triggers of sudden deaths.

  • Keeneland Posts New Requirements for Horse Entry Into Stable Area

    In an effort to control the spread of Equine Herpes Virus Type 1 (EHV-1) after consulting with the Kentucky State Veterinary Office and the Kentucky Horse Racing Authority, Keeneland will require several conditions to be met for a horse to enter its stable areas.

  • Virus Hold Order Lifted on Barn at Pimlico

    The Maryland Department of Agriculture has lifted the hold order on Barn A at Pimlico Race Course after 21 of the 25 horses in the barn tested negative for equine herpesvirus.

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Lameness in Racehorses

    Inconsistencies in racetrack surfaces account for a large number of lamenesses in racehorses, said Jeff Blea, DVM, of the Southern California Equine Foundation in Arcadia, Calif., during the Lameness in Racehorses Forum held at the 51st Annual AAEP Convention, in Seattle, Wash., Dec. 3-7, 2005. "Even though they are at the same track, the consistency of t...

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Inflammatory Airway Disease

    A racehorse running at top speed breathes about 120 times per minute, moving about 12-15 liters of air per breath or 1,400-1,800 liters per minute. With this amount of airflow, it's not hard to imagine that any amount of airway inflammation can significantly affect performance. Unfortunately, the problem is common in horses, said Susan J. Holcombe, VMD, P...

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage

    Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), or bleeding in the lungs after exercise, costs the United States horse racing industry a great deal--estimated at up to $260 million per year by Kenneth W. Hinchcliff, BVSc, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, of The Ohio State University. During his presentation at the American Association of Equine Practitioners Conventio...

  • Serum Biomarkers for Musculoskeletal Disease (AAEP 2005)

    A Colorado State University (CSU) researcher recently reported that he and his colleagues have found significant patterns of six different signals of damage or &quot;biomarkers&quot; in the serum of racehorses with certain musculoskeletal diseases. This means veterinarians are much closer to being able to anticipate the injuries or problems a horse might ...

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Using GPS to Train Racehorses

    An Australian researcher reported he's found a reliable way for trainers to monitor Thoroughbred racehorse fitness using global positioning system (GPS) technology measurements of velocity and heart rate during normal fast gallop training routines. David Evans, BVSc, PhD, associate professor in the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Sydney...

  • Kentucky Farm Managers Address EHV-1 Concerns

    In light of recent outbreaks of the equineherpes virus (EHV-1) and the Feb. 13 opening of most Central Kentucky breeding sheds, the Kentucky Thoroughbred Farm Managers Club held a discussion at its Feb. 9 meeting on how best to prevent the spread of the virus.

  • Fair Hill Training Center Takes EHV-1 Precautions

    Fair Hill Training Center, home to more than 400 horses, has instituted stringent guidelines to ensure the well being of all horses stabled at the facility and to provide the best opportunity for those same horses to race when entry restrictions lift later this month as nearby out of state racetracks.

  • Evaluating Ulcer Medications

    Studies have shown that gastric squamous (the non-glandular area of the stomach) ulcers affect approximately 80-95% of racehorses, and more than half of the entire domestic horse population. A recent study from Murdoch University in Australia determined that omeprazole (a proton-pump blocker) is more effective than ranitidine (a histamine inhibitor) when ...

  • Laurel Park Horse Tests Positive for Equine Herpesvirus

    Hey Ralphy, a filly trained by Rodney Jenkins at Laurel Park, was infected by equine herpesvirus (EHV-1), according to the Maryland Department of Agriculture. The 3-year-old was euthanized Jan 26 with a suspected pelvic injury. A Hold Order has been placed on Barn 9, where the filly was stabled, at the central Maryland track. Jenkins has elected not to train any of his horses until the Hold Order ends.

  • Trainers Worry Pimlico Quarantine is Too Late

    Though the Maryland Jockey Club has stepped up its fight against the equine herpes virus 1 that has frightened horsemen throughout the state with a quarantine of the entire Pimlico Race Course stable area, some trainers continued to worry the move may have come too late.

  • Henderson Training Track Quarantined for Herpesvirus

    A Western Kentucky training center south of Henderson was placed under quarantine by last night (Jan. 5) following tests that showed two horses in the center's one barn were positive for equine herpesvirus, according to Rusty Ford of the Kentucky state veterinarian's office.

  • Suspected Case of Equine Herpesvirus at Pimlico

    Officials at Pimlico Race Course in Maryland have isolated five horses in the detention barn and put a "hold order" on barn 5 while they determine whether a horse stabled in the barn, who was euthanized earlier this week, was infected with equine herpesvirus.

  • Five Turfway Horses Test Positive for Equine Herpesvirus

    The Kentucky State Veterinarian's Office announced Dec. 30 that while 11 horses from Turfway Park's Barn 26 that previously tested positive for equine herpesvirus now test negative, five horses still tested positive, and they quarantined seven horses in the outrider's barn.