Horse Health

Health news, veterinary advice, and educational tools to keep your horse healthy.

  • Finalists Named for George Woolf Award

    Jockeys Jon Court, Victor Espinoza, Roberto Gonzalez, Aaron Gryder, and Mario Pino are finalists for the prestigious George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award, Santa Anita Park announced Dec. 13.

  • Leptospirosis Getting an Early Start this Year

    Researchers at the University of Kentucky's Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center have reported numerous early cases of leptospirosis, a bacterial disease that can cause a variety of equine problems, including abortion, a flu-like illness, and uveitis (moon blindness). Leptospirosis can spread from horses to humans.

  • House Passes Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act

    The U.S. House of Representatives passed the "Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act" (S. 3880) by voice vote Nov.13. The bill clarifies that it is a crime to damage or interfere with a legitimate, legal animal enterprise.

  • Barbaro Doing Well After Cast Removal

    Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) winner Barbaro continues to improve following the removal of his right hind leg cast last week, according to his medical team.

  • Keeneland president Nick Nicholson, said welfare and safety summit was a "great step forward."

    Racehorse Welfare and Safety Recommendations Released

    A cross-section of prominent participants from the Thoroughbred breeding and racing industry who participated in the Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit in Lexington, on Oct. 16-17, have drafted recommended action plans in six areas to potentially improve conditions in various facets of the Thoroughbred industry.

  • Barbaro's Cast Removed; Laminitis Evaluated

    The right hind leg cast of Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) winner Barbaro was removed Nov. 6, according to his medical team at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine's New Bolton Center.

  • Equine Herpesvirus Suspected at Monmouth Park

    A suspected case of the equine herpesvirus in the stable area at Monmouth Park has forced the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which owns and operates the Oceanport track and Meadowlands in East Rutherford, to impose strict limitations on the shipment of horses.

  • Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation Announces Research Award

    The Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation announced a division of Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company will extend its research support into the field of veterinary medicine with specific focus on the equine athlete. A company contribution has been made to Grayson-Jockey Club Research Foundation to underwrite the first Elastikon Equine Research Award.

  • Summit Issues Recommendations to Improve Racehorse Safety

    The Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit ended Tuesday in Lexington after more than 40 participants worked together to draft action plans in six areas to improve conditions in the Thoroughbred industry.

  • Upper Respiratory Obstructions

    United Kingdom researchers found that dorsal displacement of the soft palate and palatal instability were to blame for poor performance in 78.5% of the horses examined in a recent treadmill study of Thoroughbred racehorses. They also found that horses were often affected by more than one airway obstruction at the same time. The study results were publishe...

  • Bone Chips: When the Chips Are Down

    In the case of bone chips, sometimes bigger is better. In a study performed in 2006, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center theorized that bone chip characteristics in a horse's knees were an indicator of the severity of the horse's injury. They were right.

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    Champion Lost in the Fog Euthanized

    Lost in the Fog, last year's Eclipse Award-winning sprinter, was euthanized Sept. 17, three weeks after doctors found three cancerous tumors in his spleen and along his back.

  • An Equine Athlete's Heart

    When it comes to the equine heart, size matters, says Lesley Young, BVSc, PhD, DVA, Dipl. ECEIM, DVC, MRCVS, who completed research on the topic while at the Animal Health Trust in Newmarket, Suffolk, United Kingdom. In her June 3 presentation at the 24th annual American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum held in Louisville, Ky., Young explaine...

  • New Vet Clinic to Open at Belmont Park

    IEAH Corporation, a subsidiary of International Equine Acquisitions Holdings, Inc. announced Thursday the formation of a state-of-the-art veterinary clinic located across the street from Belmont Park that will be run by noted veterinarians James Hunt and Patricia Hogan.

  • Surgeries and Steroids

    A survey of buyers of Thoroughbred weanlings, yearlings, and 2-year-olds discovered that surgeries to correct conformation defects have a significant influence on whether or not someone will buy a horse at public auction.

  • Equine Nutrition Conference Scheduled

    Kentucky Equine Research, Inc. is holding its 15th Annual Nutrition Conference in Lexington, Kentucky on Oct. 16-17, 2006. The theme of the conference is "From Foal to Finish–Factors Affecting the Production of the Equine Athlete."

  • Some Potomac Horse Fever Cases in Kentucky Not Unusual

    A few cases of Potomac horse fever occur each fall in Kentucky. This year, a few cases have been seen, but they occurred a little earlier than normal. Dr. Nathan Slovis, of Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, said the early occurrence probably was due to the dry weather the past month.

  • Breeding Cents

    In 2003, the horse industry directly contributed $10.7 billion to the U.S. economy; $2.2 billion of that was from the breeding industry alone, according to a study published in 2005. It's no wonder that Karin Bosh's July 11 graduate defense seminar at University of Kentucky's Gluck Equine Research Center--which identified factors such as the mare's age an...

  • MAF to Raise $2.5 Million for Consortium to Study Equine Diseases

    Morris Animal Foundation has selected the University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine to receive funding for the first ever Equine Consortium for Genetic Research grant. The goal of the $2.5 million grant is to bring together the world's best researchers in a focused, collaborative effort to improve equine health.

  • ESWG Offers Recommendations to NAIS Subcommittee

    The Equine Species Working Group made recommendations Aug. 1 to the National Animal Identification System subcommittee on how the equine industry might reach NAIS compliance in the future. Each of the different species working groups report to the NAIS subcommittee, which in turn reports to the secretary of agriculture's advisory committee on foreign animal and poultry diseases. The two focal points of the ESWG report were movement and identification.

  • EIA Cases in Ireland Prompt Action by Great Britain

    Although an outbreak of swamp fever -- Equine Infectious Anaemia -- in Ireland, with up to 18 horses reported to have been infected, appears to be in check, Britain has imposed controls beginning Aug. 14 to try and stop the disease entering the country.

  • Barbaro, had bandage on left hind foot changed Tuesday.

    Barbaro Continues in Stable Condition

    Classic winner Barbaro underwent another bandage change on his left hind foot Tuesday and Dr. Dean Richardson reports that the colt remains in stable condition at the intensive care unit of the University of Pennsylvania's George D. Widener Hospital.

  • U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, co-sponsor of horse slaughter bill.

    Federal Hearing on Horse Slaughter Draws Large Crowd

    A legislative hearing Tuesday by the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection concerning the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act drew a large crowd, causing the hearing to be moved after opening remarks.

  • Researchers Contemplate Role of Vesiviruses in MRLS

    Oregon State University (OSU) researchers announced last month that they linked vesiviruses to abortions seen during Central Kentucky's bout with mare reproductive loss syndrome in 2001 and concluded that vesivirus-specific reagents should be included in the diagnostic panel for aborting mares. A University of Kentucky researcher disagrees with the findin...

  • Dr. Dean Richardson leads Barbaro to the operating room where the colt's cast was changed Monday.

    Barbaro Gets New Bandages; Radiographs 'Look Great'

    Doctors at New Bolton Center's George D. Widener Hospital on Monday changed the cast on the hind right leg of Barbaro for the second time since the winner of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) was injured in the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) on May 20.

  • Failure of Racehorses to Train and Race

    It's commonly known that racehorses endure extreme physical and mental stresses preparing for a racing career, which can lead to injuries and illnesses. In a University of Cambridge study, researchers sought to quantify ailments endured by today's racehorses. <P>The study followed 1,022 Thoroughbreds from conception to age four. Of those, 562 entered tr...

  • EVA Outbreak Reported in New Mexico

    An outbreak of Equine Viral Arteritis has been confirmed at a New Mexico Quarter Horse farm, according to a release from the Reference Laboratory for Equine Viral Arteritis at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture's Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center.

  • Oregon State Study Links Kentucky Abortions to Virus

    A new study by veterinary researchers at Oregon State University has linked a major epidemic of abortion a few years ago in Kentucky Thoroughbred mares to infection with vesivirus, the first time the virus has been suggested to cause this type of problem in horses.

  • Zito, Jackson, Hancock Discuss Horse Slaughter Issue

    The excitement of the upcoming third jewel of the Triple Crown highlights the shining careers of Thoroughbreds in their prime, but also conjures up the tender subject of what might happen to those runners once their careers have ended.

  • Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro and Dr. Dean Richardson.

    FAQs About Barbaro; Colt Continues Daily Improvement

    Barbaro, winner of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I), continues to improve daily as he recovers from a shattered hind leg sustained at the Preakness on May 20. "I'm very pleased with the progress Barbaro is making," said chief of surgery Dean W. Richardson. "Everything is fine."

  • Online Reprint: Pet Projects at New Bolton Center

    With their shaggy manes and stocky bodies, they look like children's pets. They are the kind of animals that make people coo and exclaim, "How cute!" But the semi-feral ponies that roam the spacious pasture at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center (NBC) are the subjects of serious scientific research.

  • Dr. Jon Palmer, a specialist in premature equine birth, is Director of Neo-Natal Care at New Bolton Center.

    Premature Foals a Priority for Palmer

    "A lot of the equipment you see on the television show 'ER' we have here," says Dr. Jon Palmer, an associate professor of medicine and the director of the center's neonatal program. "We have respirators, heart monitoring equipment, blood pressure monitoring equipment, and equipment that monitors exhaled gasses. We even have a defibrillator. I only wish I could get blood gasses as fast as they do on 'ER.' "

  • A thermograph of a horse in the early stages of the onset of laminitis.

    Understanding the Threat of Laminitis

    As mentioned in previous articles, Barbaro may be susceptible to other complications during his recovery because of the severity of his injury. According to veterinary surgeon Dean Richardson, horses in his case are particularly vulnerable to laminitis or other problems in the opposite foot.