Horse Health

Health news, veterinary advice, and educational tools to keep your horse healthy.

  • New Vet Clinic to Open at Belmont Park

    IEAH Corporation, a subsidiary of International Equine Acquisitions Holdings, Inc. announced Thursday the formation of a state-of-the-art veterinary clinic located across the street from Belmont Park that will be run by noted veterinarians James Hunt and Patricia Hogan.

  • Surgeries and Steroids

    A survey of buyers of Thoroughbred weanlings, yearlings, and 2-year-olds discovered that surgeries to correct conformation defects have a significant influence on whether or not someone will buy a horse at public auction.

  • Equine Nutrition Conference Scheduled

    Kentucky Equine Research, Inc. is holding its 15th Annual Nutrition Conference in Lexington, Kentucky on Oct. 16-17, 2006. The theme of the conference is "From Foal to Finish–Factors Affecting the Production of the Equine Athlete."

  • Some Potomac Horse Fever Cases in Kentucky Not Unusual

    A few cases of Potomac horse fever occur each fall in Kentucky. This year, a few cases have been seen, but they occurred a little earlier than normal. Dr. Nathan Slovis, of Hagyard Equine Medical Institute, said the early occurrence probably was due to the dry weather the past month.

  • Breeding Cents

    In 2003, the horse industry directly contributed $10.7 billion to the U.S. economy; $2.2 billion of that was from the breeding industry alone, according to a study published in 2005. It's no wonder that Karin Bosh's July 11 graduate defense seminar at University of Kentucky's Gluck Equine Research Center--which identified factors such as the mare's age an...

  • MAF to Raise $2.5 Million for Consortium to Study Equine Diseases

    Morris Animal Foundation has selected the University of Minnesota's College of Veterinary Medicine to receive funding for the first ever Equine Consortium for Genetic Research grant. The goal of the $2.5 million grant is to bring together the world's best researchers in a focused, collaborative effort to improve equine health.

  • ESWG Offers Recommendations to NAIS Subcommittee

    The Equine Species Working Group made recommendations Aug. 1 to the National Animal Identification System subcommittee on how the equine industry might reach NAIS compliance in the future. Each of the different species working groups report to the NAIS subcommittee, which in turn reports to the secretary of agriculture's advisory committee on foreign animal and poultry diseases. The two focal points of the ESWG report were movement and identification.

  • EIA Cases in Ireland Prompt Action by Great Britain

    Although an outbreak of swamp fever -- Equine Infectious Anaemia -- in Ireland, with up to 18 horses reported to have been infected, appears to be in check, Britain has imposed controls beginning Aug. 14 to try and stop the disease entering the country.

  • Barbaro, had bandage on left hind foot changed Tuesday.

    Barbaro Continues in Stable Condition

    Classic winner Barbaro underwent another bandage change on his left hind foot Tuesday and Dr. Dean Richardson reports that the colt remains in stable condition at the intensive care unit of the University of Pennsylvania's George D. Widener Hospital.

  • U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, co-sponsor of horse slaughter bill.

    Federal Hearing on Horse Slaughter Draws Large Crowd

    A legislative hearing Tuesday by the U.S. House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection concerning the American Horse Slaughter Prevention Act drew a large crowd, causing the hearing to be moved after opening remarks.

  • Researchers Contemplate Role of Vesiviruses in MRLS

    Oregon State University (OSU) researchers announced last month that they linked vesiviruses to abortions seen during Central Kentucky's bout with mare reproductive loss syndrome in 2001 and concluded that vesivirus-specific reagents should be included in the diagnostic panel for aborting mares. A University of Kentucky researcher disagrees with the findin...

  • Dr. Dean Richardson leads Barbaro to the operating room where the colt's cast was changed Monday.

    Barbaro Gets New Bandages; Radiographs 'Look Great'

    Doctors at New Bolton Center's George D. Widener Hospital on Monday changed the cast on the hind right leg of Barbaro for the second time since the winner of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) was injured in the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) on May 20.

  • Failure of Racehorses to Train and Race

    It's commonly known that racehorses endure extreme physical and mental stresses preparing for a racing career, which can lead to injuries and illnesses. In a University of Cambridge study, researchers sought to quantify ailments endured by today's racehorses. <P>The study followed 1,022 Thoroughbreds from conception to age four. Of those, 562 entered tr...

  • EVA Outbreak Reported in New Mexico

    An outbreak of Equine Viral Arteritis has been confirmed at a New Mexico Quarter Horse farm, according to a release from the Reference Laboratory for Equine Viral Arteritis at the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture's Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center.

  • Oregon State Study Links Kentucky Abortions to Virus

    A new study by veterinary researchers at Oregon State University has linked a major epidemic of abortion a few years ago in Kentucky Thoroughbred mares to infection with vesivirus, the first time the virus has been suggested to cause this type of problem in horses.

  • Zito, Jackson, Hancock Discuss Horse Slaughter Issue

    The excitement of the upcoming third jewel of the Triple Crown highlights the shining careers of Thoroughbreds in their prime, but also conjures up the tender subject of what might happen to those runners once their careers have ended.

  • Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro and Dr. Dean Richardson.

    FAQs About Barbaro; Colt Continues Daily Improvement

    Barbaro, winner of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I), continues to improve daily as he recovers from a shattered hind leg sustained at the Preakness on May 20. "I'm very pleased with the progress Barbaro is making," said chief of surgery Dean W. Richardson. "Everything is fine."

  • Online Reprint: Pet Projects at New Bolton Center

    With their shaggy manes and stocky bodies, they look like children's pets. They are the kind of animals that make people coo and exclaim, "How cute!" But the semi-feral ponies that roam the spacious pasture at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center (NBC) are the subjects of serious scientific research.

  • Dr. Jon Palmer, a specialist in premature equine birth, is Director of Neo-Natal Care at New Bolton Center.

    Premature Foals a Priority for Palmer

    "A lot of the equipment you see on the television show 'ER' we have here," says Dr. Jon Palmer, an associate professor of medicine and the director of the center's neonatal program. "We have respirators, heart monitoring equipment, blood pressure monitoring equipment, and equipment that monitors exhaled gasses. We even have a defibrillator. I only wish I could get blood gasses as fast as they do on 'ER.' "

  • A thermograph of a horse in the early stages of the onset of laminitis.

    Understanding the Threat of Laminitis

    As mentioned in previous articles, Barbaro may be susceptible to other complications during his recovery because of the severity of his injury. According to veterinary surgeon Dean Richardson, horses in his case are particularly vulnerable to laminitis or other problems in the opposite foot.

  • TCA Approves $1.75 Million in Grants for 2006

    At its annual board meeting May 13, Thoroughbred Charities of America (TCA) approved grants of $1,750,000 to 136 non-profits, representing equine rescue/retraining, backstretch/jockey, research, education scholarships, and therapeutic riding facilities in 35 states.

  • Nureyev

    A Look Back: Saving Nureyev

    In October 1987, Walmac International and its veterinarians went to extensive lengths to save the life of stallion Nureyev. Those efforts paid off, adding 14 years to the horse's life. When the son of Northern Dancer died this past Oct. 29 at age 24, he had been represented by 130 stakes winners. This article detailing how Nureyev was saved in 1987 was originally published in the Oct. 10, 1987 <i>Blood-Horse</i>.

  • Broken Legs Aren't Death

    A fracture doesn't necessarily mean the death of a loyal companion or promising athlete. Orthopedic techniques have advanced greatly in the human world in the last three decades, and the equine world has moved in step. Technology has progressed so far that many times even the worst of injuries can be repaired.

  • Interval Training: A Better Option?

    <P>Musculoskeletal injury is the main cause of wastage in Thoroughbred racehorses worldwide, with nearly 30% of all fractures being pelvic and tibial stress fractures. California studies in the late 1990s suggested fast work increased the risk of injuries, while Kentucky studies implied high-speed exercise was protective. K.L.P. Verheyen, DVM, MSc, PhD, M...

  • Hoof Cracks: Causes and Repair

    Your horse&#39;s feet are some of the most important structures contributing to his performance ability, and most people do what they can to keep them healthy. Unfortunately, things can and do go wrong with your horse that can cause hoof cracks to form. Maybe he pulled a shoe in the pasture or grabbed his heel during a competition. Perhaps conditions have...

  • MRLS Effects Minimal in Central Florida

    The impact of the deadly mare reproductive loss syndrome has been minimal on central Florida horse farms this year, but experts say steps should be taken to limit future problems in the area's vast equine industry.

  • Geneticists Identify Speed Gene Combination

    Geneticists have disclosed the findings of a six-year study which, as well as discovering discrepancies in the stud book, for the first time details a direct correlation between specific genes and aspects of racing performance in Thoroughbreds.

  • Third MRLS Case Confirmed in Florida; Meeting Set

    An Arabian mare in Marion County, Florida, aborted a 310-day gestation (the foal was born dead) on March 13 that was confirmed as having mare reproductive loss syndrome (MRLS), according to Dr. Dana Zimmel, of the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine.

  • Interval Training: A Better Option for Racehorses?

    Musculoskeletal injury is the main cause of wastage in Thoroughbred racehorses worldwide, with nearly 30% of all fractures being pelvic and tibial stress fractures. Studies in California in the late 1990s suggested fast work increased the risk of injuries, while other studies in Kentucky implied high-speed exercise was protective. K.L.P. Verheyen, DVM, MS...

  • Using GPS to Train Racehorses

    An Australian researcher says he's found a reliable way for trainers to monitor Thoroughbred racehorse fitness using global positioning system (GPS) technology measurements of velocity and heart rate during fast gallop training routines. He presented the study at the 2005 American Association of Equine Practitioners Convention, held Dec. 3-7, 2005, in Sea...

  • Three Years of Racing Deaths in Australia

    An Australian survey found that euthanasia for catastrophic forelimb injury was the most common Thoroughbred racehorse fatality. Also, sudden death (not as the result of euthanasia) contributed more to racing fatalities than previously thought. Analyzing point-of-death blood samples could help scientists better pinpoint the triggers of sudden deaths.

  • Keeneland Posts New Requirements for Horse Entry Into Stable Area

    In an effort to control the spread of Equine Herpes Virus Type 1 (EHV-1) after consulting with the Kentucky State Veterinary Office and the Kentucky Horse Racing Authority, Keeneland will require several conditions to be met for a horse to enter its stable areas.

  • Virus Hold Order Lifted on Barn at Pimlico

    The Maryland Department of Agriculture has lifted the hold order on Barn A at Pimlico Race Course after 21 of the 25 horses in the barn tested negative for equine herpesvirus.

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Lameness in Racehorses

    Inconsistencies in racetrack surfaces account for a large number of lamenesses in racehorses, said Jeff Blea, DVM, of the Southern California Equine Foundation in Arcadia, Calif., during the Lameness in Racehorses Forum held at the 51st Annual AAEP Convention, in Seattle, Wash., Dec. 3-7, 2005. "Even though they are at the same track, the consistency of t...

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Inflammatory Airway Disease

    A racehorse running at top speed breathes about 120 times per minute, moving about 12-15 liters of air per breath or 1,400-1,800 liters per minute. With this amount of airflow, it's not hard to imagine that any amount of airway inflammation can significantly affect performance. Unfortunately, the problem is common in horses, said Susan J. Holcombe, VMD, P...

  • AAEP Convention 2005: Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage

    Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH), or bleeding in the lungs after exercise, costs the United States horse racing industry a great deal--estimated at up to $260 million per year by Kenneth W. Hinchcliff, BVSc, MS, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, of The Ohio State University. During his presentation at the American Association of Equine Practitioners Conventio...