Horse Health

Health news, veterinary advice, and educational tools to keep your horse healthy.

Neuroaxonal Dystrophy in Quarter Horses

Neuroaxonal dystrophy is a neurologic disease that can affect horses as well as humans, sheep, cats, and dogs. The condition is not yet fully understood, although researchers believe there might be a genetic component.

UW to Host First Aid Seminar for Horse Owners

The University of Wisconsin (UW) School of Veterinary Medicine Continuing Education program will be hosting its 22nd annual seminar on Feb. 19. This year's topic is "First Aid for Horses--When to Call the Vet and What to do Before Help Arrives." The morning session will be held in the Ebling Symposium Auditorium, located within the Microbial...

Genital Cancer in Horses Linked to Newly Discovered Virus

A newly discovered virus might be a cause of equine genital cancer, an aggressive type of skin cancer that affects male and female horses of all breeds, according to Tim Scase, BSc, BVM&S, PhD, MRCVS, Dipl. ACVP, director of Bridge Pathology Ltd., a diagnostic immunohistochemistry laboratory in the United Kingdom. Equine genital cancer is thought to b...

Rutgers Equine Science Center Announces Aging Horse Care Seminar

The care and management of aging horses is the overarching theme of the upcoming horse management seminar hosted by the Rutgers Equine Science Center and Rutgers Cooperative Extension. The seminar, scheduled from 8:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Feb. 13 at the Cook Campus Center in New Brunswick, N.J., will feature presentations by several equine industry author...

DHA Positively Affects Semen Quality

Various supplements are commonly given to breeding stallions in hopes of improving semen quality, but conflicting reports exist on their effectiveness. Researchers have found, however, that the supplement ingredient DHA, an omega-3 fatty acid found in fish oil, does have a positive affect on semen quality.

Managing Pasture-Associated Laminitis

Laminitis is not a modern condition--it has been recognized for well over 2,000 years. The Greek philosopher Aristotle even referred to it around 350 B.C. as 'Barley Disease,' presumably because it was associated even then with excessive grain consumption. However, according to Patricia Harris, MA, PhD, Dipl. ECVCN, VetMB, MRCVS, there has recentl...

Bone Chips in the Knee and Racing Potential (AAEP 2010)

Before purchasing a yearling it's important to review his health records to ensure he is healthy and sound enough for a successful racing career. Jennifer L. Higgins, DVM, gave potential buyers insight into specific lesions that could reduce a horse's career earnings when she presented a retrospective study on the subject at the 56th Annual Conven...

Feeding to Achieve a Moderate Body Condition

Every horseperson has seen the telltale signs of a thin horse: the disproportionately skinny neck, the protruding spine, the row of ribs, and the jutting hipbones. Thanks in part to advances made in feeding management, veterinary care, parasite control, and dentistry, educated caretakers can fatten horses safely and easily. But when is it time to switch f...

Pennsylvania Horse Expo to Feature Equine Health Presentations

The 2011 Pennsylvania Horse World Expo is slated to take place Feb. 24 -27 at the Farm Show Complex and Expo Center in Harrisburg, Pa. During the event many equine professionals will be on hand to share their knowledge on a diverse list of topics. Join them for research-based discussions on the many issues that today's horse owners are facing. There a...

Equine Collapse: Once in a Lifetime?

A horse that collapses while under saddle is both a hazard to himself and others. What does this mean for his potential as a mount, though? For many horses, suffering an episode of collapse (when a horse falls suddenly with or without recumbency--the inability to stand--or loss of consciousness) is a once-in-a-lifetime occurrence, according to a Scottish ...

USDA to Hold Committee Meeting on Animal Health

The USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will hold the Secretary's Advisory Committee's first meeting on Animal Health Jan. 20 and 21. The meeting will be held in the Jamie L. Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue S.W., Washington, D.C., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day, in rooms 104-A and 107-A. Tentative discussion to...

Speakers Announced for University of Maryland Seminars

The Equine Studies Program at the University of Maryland has put together a line-up of 31 industry-leading speakers for their University Seminar Series to be hosted at the Maryland Horse World Expo, Jan. 20-23, 2011. This seminar series provides horse enthusiasts the opportunity to learn up-to-date information about a variety of equine related topics. Pro...

Equine Piroplasmosis: An In-Depth Review (AAEP 2010)

Equine piroplasmosis (EP), which is classified as a foreign animal disease, has made several appearances in the United States over the past few years, and it's causing concern at racetracks around the nation--the main locations at which EP has been diagnosed. But horse owners should be happy to know that their horses are likely not at risk for contrac...

Horse Processing Plants: Not Just a Horse Issue

As the lackluster economy continues to challenge the horse industry, ranchers, lawmakers, and horse owners gathered at the Summit of the Horse in Las Vegas, Nev., this week to discuss the economic state of the industry and the unwanted horse issue. One of the topics drawing much attention to the summit was ways to re-establish the horse processing industr...

Students Given Opportunity to Learn About Equine Careers

The Kentucky Horse Council (KHC) will once again offer Kentucky students the opportunity to learn about careers in the equine and related industries at the "Your Future in Agriculture & Horses" event. The bulk of the event provides an opportunity for students to meet with representatives from programs participating in the Agricultural Trade ...

Horses Being Rescued from Australian Floods

The extreme flooding in Queensland, Australia, has reached what some reporters are calling "biblical proportions." The still-rising water now covers an area as large as France and Germany combined, according to a report on the ABC Brisbane website. The damage from the water (which could rise to 30 feet or more) is expected to exceed $1 billion, ...

Fescue: A Danger to Pregnant Mares

In many parts of the world horse pastures contain a fair percentage of fescue, a hardy perennial grass that thrives despite heavy hoof traffic, intense grazing, and adverse growing conditions. Unfortunately, there's a drawback: 75% of all fescue is infected with the endophyte Acremonium coenophialum.

Stem Cells Improve Cartilage Repair for Arthritic Horses (AAEP 2010)

Osteoarthritis (sometimes called degenerative joint disease) is the most common cause of lameness in horses and currently there is no cure.1 However, researchers continue to improve available treatment methods. At the 2010 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Dec. 4-8 in Baltimore, Md., Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD, DSc, FRCVS, Dip...

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