Headlines for Saturday, September 3, 2011

  • 2011 Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom<br><a target="blank" href="http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/photo-store?ref=http%3A%2F%2Fpictopia.com%2Fperl%2Fgal%3Fprovider_id%3D368%26ptp_photo_id%3D9517735%26ref%3Dstory">Order This Photo</a>

    Animal Kingdom Cleared for Exercise

    Team Valor International's winner of the Kentucky Derby Presented by Yum! Brands (gr. I) cleared to resume exercise 60 days after undergoing season-ending surgery on his left leg.

  • The Molly Pitcher belonged to Quiet Giant.

    Quiet Giant Squashes Rivals in Molly Pitcher

    Odds-on choice Quiet Giant took charge midway on the far turn and drew away under brisk handling from jockey Julien Leparoux to register a five-length win in the $252,500 Hill 'N' Dale Molly Pitcher Stakes (gr. II) Sept. 3.

  • Ask the Moon and Javier Castellano are victorious in the Personal Ensign at Saratoga.<br><a target="blank" href="http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/photo-store?ref=http%3A%2F%2Fpictopia.com%2Fperl%2Fgal%3Fprovider_id%3D368%26ptp_photo_id%3D9655038%26ref%3Dstory">Order This Photo</a>

    Ask the Moon Weaves Way to Personal Ensign

    While racing erratically through the lane, front-running Ask the Moon captured the Personal Ensign Invitational Stakes Sept. 3 for her second grade I stakes win in a row at Saratoga this summer.

  • Emulous flies home to win the Matron Stakes.<br><a target="blank" href="http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/photo-store?ref=http%3A%2F%2Fpictopia.com%2Fperl%2Fgal%3Fprovider_id%3D368%26ptp_photo_id%3D9654958%26ref%3Dstory">Order This Photo</a>

    Emulous Flies to Victory in Matron Stakes

    Emulous continued a terrific racing season for Juddmonte Farm when she swept past Together to win the $255,500 Coolmore Fusaichi Pegasus Matron Stakes (Ire-I) by three widening lengths at Leopardstown Sept. 3.

  • Study: Improved Owner Education Needed for Older Horse Care

    Thanks to advances in veterinary medical technology, today's horses are living longer and more comfortable lives than horses in the past. However in order to make use of that technology, owners must first be able to detect when there's something not quite right with their animals--especially with geriatric horses. As a team of British researchers ...