Headlines for Monday, July 14, 2008

  • Sailor's Cap won the June 21 Colonial Turf Cup (gr. IIIT).

    Virginia Derby Full of Familiar Faces

    Many racing officials at Colonial Downs, weary of Central Virginia downpours, may have to pardon trainer James Toner if he does a rain dance Saturday morning before the $750,000 Virginia Derby (gr. IIT). His trainee, Sailor's Cap, will attempt to defeat eight others in the 1 1/4-mile contest for 3-year-olds on the turf.

  • Stolen Chevy with trainer Mike Estes

    InsideTrack: Different Kind of Beginning

    In this day and age, more and more stories seem to be popping up about Thoroughbreds being retired from racing and retrained to do different jobs, from police assistants to track ponies to show circuit performers.

  • Hip 145, a son of Unforgettable Max, sold for $330,000 during day one of the July Fasig-Tipton Yearling Sale.

    High Buy-Backs and $330k Colt Open FTK

    A colt from the first crop of Unforgettable Max sold for $330,000, and the buy-back rate rose to 44.1% during the first session of the Fasig-Tipton Kentucky July select yearling auction July 14. The average price rose 5.4% and the median stayed steady at $75,000. The sale continues Tuesday.

  • Japan May Allow Foreign Owners' Licenses

    Spurred to take action by a troubled economy and the need for more investment in horse racing, leaders of the sport in Japan are seriously discussing opening up the world's most lucrative racing program to foreign-based owners.

  • Casino Drive training prior to the June 7 Belmont Stakes (gr. I)

    Casino Drive's Journey to Cup Begins

    Casino Drive, the Japanese-trained colt whose bruised foot prevented him from trying to follow in the hoofprints of his two Belmont Stakes (gr. I)-winning siblings, has entered quarantine in Japan as the first step to returning to the United States.

  • The JHRA yearling sales topper, a son of Agnes Tachyon.

    Japan Sale Has Foreign Flavor

    Even before the Japan Racing Horse Association select sale hummed into action on July 14 with the sing-song chant of the auctioneer, a new era in the Japanese bloodstock market had officially begun.