Headlines for Sunday, May 21, 2006

  • Straight Shooter Stratham Corrals Will Rogers

    Irish-bred Stratham rallied along the inside under jockey David Cohen to win Sunday's $100,000 Will Rogers (gr. IIIT) for 3-year-olds on the Hollywood Park turf by three-quarters of a length over New Joysey Jeff, registering his third win in four North American starts.

  • Everyone was all smiles after successful surgery.

    After Successful Surgery, Barbaro's Chances Remain 'Coin Toss'

    Veterinary surgeon Dean Richardson and trainer Michael Matz flashed smiles during a press briefing that followed afternoon-long surgery Sunday to repair the right hind ankle of classic winner Barbaro that was severely injured one day earlier in the Preakness Stakes (gr. I) at Pimlico. Barbaro was standing and eating in a recovery stall following the surgery at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa.

  • State Vet Says Barbaro Not Injured in Starting Gate

    David G. Zipf, chief veterinarian for the Maryland State Racing Commission, is convinced classic winner Barbaro did not suffer his career-ending injury in the starting gate when he broke through the stalls prior to the start of Saturday's Preakness Stakes (gr. I) at Pimlico.

  • Veterinarians Discuss Barbaro's Injury Prior to Surgery

    Drs. Dean Richardson and Barbara Dallap met briefly with the press shortly after noon Sunday at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa., to discuss the surgery about to be performed on Roy and Gretchen Jackson's Barbaro, the classic-winning Dynaformer colt who suffered a life-threatening right hind leg injury and was pulled up shortly after the start of Saturday's Preakness Stakes (gr. I) at Pimlico.

  • Jockey Edgar Prado and an unidentified man attempt to calm Barbaro after he  was pulled up at the start of the Preakness.

    Surgery Scheduled Sunday Afternoon for Barbaro

    Kentucky Derby winner Barbaro, who suffered multiple fractures soon after the start of Saturday's Preakness Stakes (gr. I), has been taken to the George D. Widener Hospital for Large Animals at the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center in Kennett Square, Pa. He is scheduled to undergo surgery Sunday afternoon.

  • Broken Legs Aren't Death

    A fracture doesn't necessarily mean the death of a loyal companion or promising athlete. Orthopedic techniques have advanced greatly in the human world in the last three decades, and the equine world has moved in step. Technology has progressed so far that many times even the worst of injuries can be repaired.