Headlines for Tuesday, February 17, 2004

  • Lone Star Park Charities Distributes $102,000

    The Lone Star Park Charitable Foundation for Grand Prairie distributed $102,000 to 19 Grand Prairie, Tex. charities on Tuesday during a brief ceremony at Lone Star Park at Grand Prairie.

  • Crafty Shaw, seeks second Essex Handicap victory.

    Crafty Shaw, Docent Expected for Saturday's Essex

    The Essex Handicap (gr. III) at Oaklawn Park Saturday is expected to feature two previous winners of the 1 1/16-mile contest -- Crafty Shaw and Maysville Slew -- as well as 2002 Arkansas Derby (gr. II) winner Private Emblem, who is undefeated at Oaklawn Park.

  • NYRA chairman Barry Schwartz.

    Schwartz: Franchise Extension Needed for VLTs

    New York state has no choice but to give the New York Racing Association an extension of its franchise if it wants to get video lottery terminals operating at Aqueduct, NYRA chairman Barry Schwartz said.

  • Judge Orders Recertification of Texas Stakes Winner

    Texas Judge Charles Mitchell has ordered the Texas Thoroughbred Association to recertify Chauffe Au Rouge as an accredited Texas-bred racehorse. Mitchell made the decision Feb. 6 in response to a lawsuit filed against the TTA by James Donnan and Gerald Mackey, owners of the 8-year-old bay gelding by Red Attack.

  • Cat's At Home's First Foal Is a Colt

    The first reported foal sired by grade II winner Cat's At Home is a colt born Feb. 11 at Brian Wallace's Wallace Thoroughbreds near Oshawa, Ontario, Canada.

  • Danehill's Dam, Razyana, Dies

    Juddmonte Farms' blue hen mare Razyana, whose son Danehill ranks as the most successful shuttle stallion of all time, died the night of Feb. 14 from complications from hemorrhaging.

  • Ray Paulick<br>Editor-in-Chief

    Raises For Roses

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- It's only mid-February, but it's never too early to start talking about the Kentucky Derby (gr. I) and the Visa Triple Crown Challenge.

  • Joss Collins

    Colorful Commentary

    <i>By Frances J. Karon</i> -- A colleague remembers Joss Collins as a man even more colorful than the multi-colored shirt that was his trademark.