Headlines for Friday, May 18, 2001

  • Churchill Strikes Deal with Off Shore Business

    Churchill Downs announced Friday that it will provide simulcast accounting services to Racing and Gaming Services, a company on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts that handles wagers on Thoroughbred, harness, and Greyhound races.

  • Grady Stepping Down as Tampa Bay Downs GM

    John Grady Jr. is stepping down as vice president and general manager of Tampa Bay Downs, but will remain associated with the track as a consultant. Grady was the overseer of significant improvements at the Florida racetrack, and a controversial figure during contract negotiations with horsemen.

  • Facts About Fescue

    Fescue toxicosis (toxicosis is any disease condition due to poisoning) is caused when tall fescue (<i>Festuca arundinacaea</i>) becomes infected with the mold <i>Acremonium coenophialum</i>.

  • License Fee, with Pat Day in the irons, wins the Gallorette.

    License to Win Stakes Races

    By being spotted right, License Fee has amassed earnings of over $1 million. No huge hits, just consistency. She did it again Friday at Pimlico, flying home to win the $100,000 Gallorette Handicap (gr. III) over import Starina.

  • The Blood-Horse to Support MRLS Research

    In an effort to show support for industry horse owners and breeders, The Blood-Horse, Inc., announced yesterday it will contribute a portion of its advertising revenues for the remainder of 2001 to the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky, to support further research into the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome that is currently plaguing the Thoroughbred industry.

  • Australia Lifts Ban on European Imports

    The Australian Government has lifted its temporary suspension on the movement of Thoroughbreds to Australia from Europe. The official announcement came May 17 through Biosecurity Australia, a department of the Government agency covering agriculture, fisheries and forestry. It means that Danehill and the other 36 stallions scheduled to shuttle to Australia in early August can proceed.

  • The Blood-Horse to Support MRLS Research

    In an effort to show support for industry horse owners and breeders, The Blood-Horse, Inc., announced yesterday it will contribute a portion of its advertising revenues for the remainder of 2001 to the Maxwell H. Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky, to support further research into the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome that is currently plaguing the Thoroughbred industry.

  • Unshaded Successful in Return; Stephen Foster Next

    James Tafel's 4-year-old gelding Unshaded returned to the races Thursday for the first time since winning the Travers Stakes (gr. I) last August, winning a Churchill Downs allowance race by 1 1/2 lengths. Unshaded, who had been sidelined by a tendon injury, completed the 1 1/16 miles in 1:42.11 under Robby Albarado.

  • One of several mycotoxin binders available is Hallway Feeds&#39; Mare Guard.

    Where to Find the Mycotoxin Binder

    Lexington, Ky., feed companies are busy filling orders for bags and buckets of mycotoxin binder from horse owners in 15 states throughout the East Coast and Canada. Here is a list of companies selling the binder and associated products.

  • European Federation of Thoroughbred Breeders Suggests Holding US Horses; No Ban

    Charles Frank, the veterinary advisor to the United Kingdom Thoroughbred Breeders Association, said that in a meeting earlier this week of the European Federation of Thoroughbred Breeders that a statement was made to advise members not to re-import horses to Europe until a cause of the current health problems in Kentucky was identified. "The last thing we want is a ban," said Frank.

  • Florida Tracking Kentucky Hay

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has assured by the Florida State Veterinarian that there is no ban on the entry of Kentucky-grown hay into the state of Florida.

  • European Federation of Thoroughbred Breeders Suggests Holding US Horses; No Ban

    Charles Frank, the veterinary advisor to the United Kingdom Thoroughbred Breeders Association, said that in a meeting earlier this week of the European Federation of Thoroughbred Breeders that a statement was made to advise members not to re-import horses to Europe until a cause of the current health problems in Kentucky was identified. "The last thing we want is a ban," said Frank.