Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc

  • Platelet-Rich Plasma: Healing Skin Wounds in Horses

    <P>Brazilian researchers report that platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is beneficial for healing surgical wounds in horses, <A href="http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=13717">contrary to previous reports</A>. &nbsp; <P>Because wound healing in horses is frequently problematic from both a clinical and economical point of view, methods to improve healin...

  • Gastric Cancer in Horses: Researchers Scope out the Details

    <P>Abdominal tumors are only rarely diagnosed in horses, but the amount of time horses usually survive after such a finding is shockingly short. Because the signs of gastric cancer are vague, diagnosing gastric cancer in horses&nbsp;can be&nbsp;challenging. Often, even narrowing the problem down to the stomach in a timely fashion proves to be near impossi...

  • Tendons Show Improved Healing with Glycosaminoglycan Polysulfate

    <P>Injecting glycosaminoglycan polysulfate directly into lesions of the superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) significantly improves reorganization of the tendon's collagen bundles during the healing process, report Brazilian veterinary researchers. <P>Tendon injuries are an important source of lameness and decreased performance in horses. Despite ag...

  • Diseases Potentially Spread from Horses to Humans Via Bites Reviewed

    <P>The long list of diseases that humans&nbsp;could potentially&nbsp;contract after being bitten by a horse gives new meaning to the old adage, "Don't look a gift horse in the mouth." <P>According to the report, "That Horse Bit Me: Zoonotic Infections of Equines to Consider After Exposure Through the Bite or the Oral/Nasal Secretions," more than 100,000...

  • Experimental Endotoxemia Drug Performs Poorly in Horse Study

    <I></I> <P>Pirfenidone, a unique experimental drug with anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory properties, afforded no apparent therapeutic benefit in horses with experimentally-induced endotoxemia, leaving Cal Davis researchers rather disappointed. <P>"<A href="http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=12361">Previous studies</A> led us to believe that...

  • Neurectomy Effects on Suspensory Ligament Discussed in Case Report

    <P>Neurectomy of the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve resulted in a "profound" atrophy of the muscular portion of the proximal suspensory ligament reports researchers in the <I>Equine Veterinary Journal</I>. <P>The surgical procedure is routinely performed for the management of inflammation of the proximal suspensory ligament (proximal suspensor...

  • Link Between Drugs and Racehorse Injuries is a Work In Progress

    Higher levels of two different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were identified in Thoroughbred racehorses suffering musculoskeletal injuries in Kentucky Racing Commission races compared to non-injured horses. But whether these elevated levels contribute to musculoskeletal injuries or not remains to be determined, reported a group of veterin...

  • Ireland's EIA Experience: What Did We Learn?

    <P>In 2006, Ireland was rocked by an outbreak of equine infectious anemia (EIA) that was rapidly contained by veterinarians and the Irish Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (<A href="http://www.thehorse.com/viewArticle.aspx?ID=8594">read more</A>). Despite their quick action, the fallout from this outbreak has been widespread. In the three year...

  • African Horse Sickness Vaccine a Work in Progress

    <P>North America is free of the African horse sickness virus, yet this disease poses an important threat should an infected horse or a biting midge that harbors the virus be introduced. <P><A href="https://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=13985">African horse sickness</A> (AHS) is the most lethal disease known to horses. Fortunately for American hor...

  • Detecting Tapeworms, Reducing Resistance through 'Diagnostic Deworming'

    <P><I></I> <P>Diagnostic deworming of horses with anti-tapeworm drugs could play an important role in reducing resistance to antiparasitic drugs, report veterinarians from Japan and North America. <P><A href="http://www.thehorse.com/pdf/tapeworms/Tapeworm.pdf">Tapeworm infections</A> are an important issue in equine health. Infections are difficult to ...

  • Equine 'Breathalyzer' Helps Diagnose Lower Airway Inflammation

    <P>Based on diagnostic tests currently used in human medicine, researchers from the University of Glasgow in the United Kingdom have reported preliminary findings on the use of an easy and non-invasive analysis of "exhaled breath condensate" that could lead to improved diagnosis and monitoring of lower airway disease in horses. <P>Lower airway inflammat...

  • Widespread Drug Contamination Found at Racetracks

    <P>Since racetrack environments contain residues of multiple drugs that can be detected by standard testing procedures, environmental drug contamination as an explanation for positive drug tests in racehorses needs to be considered like it currently is in human athletes, said researcher Steven A. Barker, BS, MS, PhD, Everett D. Besch Distinguished Profess...

  • Researchers Examine Oral Acetate for Equine Exercise Recovery

    <P><I></I> <P>An inaugural study has found that a sodium acetate electrolyte solution given orally with a typical hay and grain meal following exercise enhanced skeletal muscle metabolism to restore depleted glycogen (energy) sources. <P>"Glycogen stored in muscle is the primary energy source for horses undergoing either short-term, high intensity or p...

  • Keeping Venezuelan Equine Encephalomyelitis 'Foreign'

    <P><I></I> <P>Most horse owners are familiar with Eastern and Western equine encephalomyelitis, if only through the statement they receive from their veterinarian following their horses' annual vaccinations. But there's another "EE" that, while long absent from the United States, should not be forgotten: Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, or VEE. <P>...

  • Anhidrosis: Altered Thyroid Function a Potential Contributor

    <P>Despite the fact that&nbsp;20% of racehorses in the southern United States are affected by anhidrosis--the inability or decreased ability to sweat--the underlying causes of this medical condition remain unknown. <P>Sweating is the primary means by which exercising horses dissipate heat. Anhidrotic horses are typically exercise intolerant, have an inc...

  • Speed Researcher Says Horses Have Reached their Limit

    <P><I></I> <P><I></I> <P>It doesn't look like Thoroughbred racehorses will be breaking records anytime soon ... or perhaps ever again. <P>According to Mark Denny, PhD, of California's Stanford University, a plateau in racing speed was reached back in 1949, 1971, and 1973 for the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and Belmont Stakes, respectively. <P>...

  • Foal Weight Partially Dependent on Parity in New Study

    <P><I></I> <P>Australian researchers based at Coolmore Stud in New South Wales, Australia, reported in a new study that placental weight and parity (number of foals a mare has had) are positively associated with foal weight. In contrast, neither gestation length nor age of mare were implicated in affecting birth weight. <P>"It is widely perceived by th...

  • Canadian Researchers Focus on Racehorse Safety

    Since the loss of Barbaro and Eight Belles, NBC's Roundtable on the horseracing industry at the 2008 Preakness Stakes, and the congressional hearing in June 2008, researchers are highlighting their efforts to improve racehorse safety and Canadian scientists are not to be left out. <P>"The Ontario Veterinary College's Comparative Orthopaedic Research Lab...

  • Understanding and Preventing Catastrophic Injuries

    Following the euthanasia of filly Eight Belles, who suffered catastrophic injuries to both front legs a quarter mile after finishing second in the 2008 Kentucky Derby, members of every sector of the Thoroughbred industry have banded together to proactively address safety and welfare issues. In this article, representative members of the equine industry to...

  • Heart Murmurs: No Impact on Racing Performance in New Study

    <P>According to a group of researchers from the United Kingdom, heart murmurs are common in athletic horses, but do not negatively impact racing performance. <P>"A high prevalence of heart murmurs is known to exist in horses," explained Lesley Young, BVSc, PhD, DVA, Dipl. ECEIM (European College of Equine Internal Medicine), DVC, MRCVS, an equine cardio...