Stacey Oke, DVM, MSc

  • Oral Steroids Beneficial for Horses with Airway Disease

    For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that the corticosteroid prednisolone improves the lung function of horses with recurrent airway obstruction, even in the presence of continuous exposure to antigens. The same study also revealed that a low dose of a similar drug, dexamethasone, reversed airway obstruction despite continues antigen exposure.

  • Researchers Track Lawsonia intracellularis Spread

    Lawsonia intracellularis is being forced out of hiding and its secrets extracted largely because of the intense research efforts of scientists like Nicola Pusterla, DVM, PhD, Dipl. ACVIM, and his colleagues at the University of California, Davis, and the University of Minnesota, St. Paul.

  • Eye Removal Surgery Recovery Reviewed (AAEP 2009)

    Horses recover from general anesthesia following removal of an eye (enucleation) equally well as horses recovering from other types of surgeries, reported veterinarians and surgeons from the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center during a presentation at the 2009 American Association of Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Convention, held Dec. 6-9 in ...

  • Lawsonia Infection in Foals: No Negative Effect as Adults (AAEP 2009)

    Horses that recover from Lawsonia intracellularis infections cost less as yearlings than their siblings, but they race just as well, reported Michele L. Frazer, DVM, Dipl. ACVIM, of Hagyard Equine Medical Institute in Lexington, Ky. Frazer presented a study on the subject during the 2009 American Association for Equine Practitioners (AAEP) Convention, hel...

  • Common Castration Complications (AAEP 2009)

    Complications associated with equine castrations occur commonly and should be indentified and treated properly in the field, relayed Liberty M. Getman, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, from the University of Pennsylvania's New Bolton Center. She presented "Review of castration complications: Strategies for treatment in the field" at the American Association...

  • 'Roaring' Surgery Results Examined in New Studies

    Surgery to correct "roaring" in National Hunt Thoroughbred racehorses can restore racing performance to levels similar to a matched group of peers in the short term, but career longevity appears to be negatively impacted following these procedures, report a team of UK researchers led by Safia Barakzai, BVSc, MSc, DESTS, Dipl ECVS, from the Royal...

  • Infected Joints' Bacteria Examined in New Study

    While many veterinarians have long suspected that infected joints from which bacteria can be cultured result in a poorer outcome than joints from which no bacteria could be cultured, this hypothesis was recently substantiated by a group of United Kingdom researchers led by Tim Mair, BVSc, MRCVS, DEIM, DESTS, Dipl. ECEIM, of the Bell Equine Veterinary Clinic.

  • West Nile Virus Risk Factors Identified

    A variety of environmental factors might be related to West Nile virus infections in horses, reported a Florida research team lead by Leslie M.V. Rios, PhD, from the Department of Entomology and Nematology at the University of Florida in Gainesville.

  • Lameness Exams: Vets Seek Reliable Approach

    After identifying a lack of reliability and repeatability in experienced veterinarians' evaluation of lameness, a group of vets have challenged the industry to search for and develop "a more objective and reliable method of lameness evaluation for us in the field," and noted that such efforts "should be encouraged and supported."

  • Degenerative Suspensory Ligament Desmitis Update

    Peruvian Paso, Arabian, American Saddlebred, and American Quarter Horse owners have been patiently waiting for an update on the diagnosis and treatment of equine systemic proteoglycan accumulation (ESPA). While no new data has been published recently, researchers have been working diligently to make progress in this field.

  • Aging Horses' Immune Systems Reviewed

    As if equine Cushing's, metabolic syndrome, laminitis, and insulin resistance weren't enough to worry about in our aging horses, we can now add "immunosenescence" and "inflammaging" to the list.

  • Roaring Improved after Electroacupuncture

    Electroacupuncture--the electrical stimulation of acupuncture points--can be an effective method of controlling laryngeal hemiplegia (roaring), reported researchers performing the technique on horses presented to the Veterinary Medical Center of the University of Florida.

  • Osteochondrosis: Oral Hyaluronic Acid Study in Spain

    An oral hyaluronan product did not produce any improvement in clinical or biochemical parameters in horses diagnosed with osteochondrosis in a new study, researchers from the Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain, recently reported. The study authors concluded that the evaluated product likely resulted in no detectable effect due to the small nu...

  • Old Horse Colicking? Consider Surgery a Viable Option

    Geriatric horses have lower survival rates than younger horses following exploratory colic surgery, but there's no significant difference in long term survival rates between age groups, report Florida equine veterinarians in a new study. Most horses discharged post-surgically were still alive one year later, regardless of their age.

  • Late Term Abortion in Mares Reviewed for World Equine Veterinarians

    Failure to conceive and early embryonic death both negatively impact the equine breeding industry; however, late-term abortions also occur and should not be ignored, said Michelle M. LeBlanc, DMV, Dipl. ACT, from Rood & Riddle Equine Hospital in Lexington, Ky., during the 11th Congress of the World Equine Veterinary Association, which was held Sept. 2...

  • Tendon Sheaths as a Source of Lameness in Horses

    Tendons can be an important source of lameness in athletic horses, but issues with the tendon's sheath--the thin connective tissue wrapped around the tendons, containing synovial fluid--shouldn't be overlooked as another potential cause of lameness.

  • Racehorse Researchers Could Learn from Dairy Industry, Scientist Says

    <P>Horses are cows, said veterinary researcher N. Edward Robinson, BVetMed, PhD, MRCVS, Matilda R. Wilson Chair in Large Animal Clinical Sciences at Michigan State University. <P>Well, what Robinson actually said was that the "racehorse and modern dairy cow have several things in common." Both have been genetically selected for performance via a small n...

  • Equine Recurrent Uveitis Biomarker Research a Real Eye Opener

    <P>Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU) is the most common cause of blindness in horses and is believed to affect approximately 10% of the equine population. The exact cause of ERU remains unclear, although&nbsp;researchers have shown that recurrent bouts of inflammation involving activated T-cells (cells largely responsible for cell-mediated immunity) lead to ...

  • Osteoarthritis: Turmeric Spice Might Provide Natural Remedy

    <P>Curcumin, an extract of the spice turmeric, is a natural product with potent anti-inflammatory properties that also exerts beneficial effects on cartilage metabolism. Scientists believe curcumin inhibits degradative enzymes such as metalloproteinases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and reduces cartilage cell apoptosis (programmed cell death). <P>To stud...

  • Study: Throat Anatomy Differs in DDSP Horses

    <P>Horses with persistent dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP), an important performance-limiting abnormality of the upper respiratory tract, have a different anatomic location of the larynx than horses with only intermittent DDSP, report Cornell University researchers. <P>DDSP affects approximately 10% to 20% of racehorses and is diagnosed by ...

  • Researchers Describe New Equine Respiratory Condition

    <P>The bacterium <I>Stenotrophomonas maltophilia</I> can be associated with chronic lower airway disease in horses, reports a group of Danish researchers. <P><I>S. maltophilia</I> is a Gram-negative bacterium that is causing disease more often&nbsp;in humans, particularly among the immunocompromised population, but it&nbsp;is only rarely reported as cau...

  • Compost Horse Manure Appropriately to Reduce Disease Spread

    <P>Horse manure needs to be 'cooked' for a specific length of time and at high enough temperatures to result in sufficient reductions in viability of roundworm (<EM>Parascaris equorum</EM>) eggs and <EM>Rhodococcus equi</EM> populations, report French researchers. <P>Composting, a popular method of managing horse manure generated on both small and large...

  • Study: Single EHV-1 Mutation Can Cause Lethal Neurologic Disease

    <P>A single mutation in the genome of equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) was "necessary and sufficient" to cause neurologic disease in horses in a new study, reported Cornell University researchers. <P>All strains of EHV-1 can cause respiratory disease and abortion, but only a subset of EHV-1 strains can cause neurologic disease said Nikolaus Osterrieder, DVM...

  • EHV-1 Neurologic Disease a Challenge for Researchers

    <P>Despite the remarkable advances in understanding neurologic disease in horses, including the identification of the single genetic mutation that gives rise to the neuropathogenic form of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1), virologists continue to experience frustrations when it comes to studying EHV-1 in the experimental setting. <P>EHV-1 causes aborti...

  • Study: Neurologic Strain of Equine Herpesvirus-1 Increasing

    <P>The number of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) infections caused by the neuropathogenic form of the virus has been steadily increasing over the past 51 years, report researchers from the University of Kentucky. <P>Clinical observations suggest that neuropathogenic strains of EHV-1 (i.e., strains of EHV-1 with a single mutation in the gene that encod...

  • Delaying Dewormer Resistance: Advice Offered in Study

    <P>Nonchemical parasite control strategies, fecal egg count monitoring, and controlled quarantine treatments&nbsp;all can&nbsp;delay the development of <A href="http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=14011">anthelmintic resistance</A>&nbsp;(AR) in horses. <P>These were the recommendations made by a group of German researchers from the University of...

  • Aseptic Platelet-Rich Plasma Preparation Essential in Equine Practice

    <P>Special laboratory equipment is not needed to produce bacteria-free platelet concentrates (commonly referred to as platelet-rich plasma), but stringent attention to proper aseptic technique is essential. <P>Equine veterinarians are using platelet concentrates more often for the management of musculoskeletal disease. They can be prepared using a varie...

  • Bitless Bridles Touted as Safer Alternative for Horses in New Study

    <P>Previous studies evaluating the behavioral responses of horses to different types of bridles found that horses perform at least as well, if not better, with a bitless bridle than a jointed snaffle. <P>To probe deeper into the issue, Robert Cook, FRCVS, PhD, and Daniel Mills, BVSc, PhD, IL TM, CBiol MIBiol, MRCVS, tested their hypothesis that a horse’...

  • Investigating Platelet-Rich Plasma for Equine Tendon Injuries

    <P>A&nbsp;single injection of platelet-rich plasma appears beneficial for acute clinical tendon injuries in horses, report a group of scientists from The Netherlands. <P>Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a fraction of whole blood that contains a concentrated source of platelets--microscopic storage facilities for a variety of growth factors that facilitate ...