• Ray Paulick<br>Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Scandalous

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Racing has no commissioner, so when a substance, possibly cobra venom, was found in a trainer's barn a month ago, there is no swift and decisive action, only inaction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Now's The Time

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Unlike existing news products delivered once a day, BloodhorseNOW.com will be a vibrant, constantly updated online resource pulling in the latest information from racetracks, auction rings, and breeding sheds.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Last Laugh

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Funny Cide was in more living rooms than any other person or animal leading up to the 2003 Belmont Stakes.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Forked Tongue

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Included in that "it's not illegal if you can't test for it" category is cobra venom, the use of which has been rumored for years. The substance, believed to be 1,000 times more powerful than morphine, can help a horse run through pain by blocking impulses through the nervous system. Use of the substance in horse racing is illegal. Worse yet, it's cruel to the animal.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Stables and Stability

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The revolving door at Magna didn't start with Neuman. Since Stronach formed Magna Entertainment in February 2000, there have been six CEOs.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Jewels Of The Triple Crown

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - What fans got this year were three incredible horse races that ended with three very accomplished and deserving winners, punctuated by the history-making performance of Rags to Riches, the first filly winner of the Belmont since Tanya in 1905.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Mother's Day

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - There is a touch of irony that Mom's Command will be inducted into the Hall of Fame the same year as the trainer of Forward Pass, Henry Forrest, who was elected by the Historic Review Committee.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Commentary: Peak Preakness

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The fighting spirit shown by both Curlin and Street Sense in this terrific stretch battle epitomizes what breeding and racing Thoroughbreds is all about.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Bay Watch

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Racing has enough problems without a grandstanding politician using his position to wage a personal war with a state regulator.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    High Jinx

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Finally, after 23 years, Breeders' Cup officials can let out a sigh of relief. James Tafel's Street Sense proved that life does exist for a horse after winning the Bessemer Trust Breeders' Cup Juvenile (gr. I).

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Word On The Street

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - For some, just getting a horse to Churchill Downs on the first Saturday in May is the realization of a dream. For others who've been there before, it's about winning -- pure and simple.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Made To Be Broken

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - This year brings us to a couple of tried and tested chapters from the unwritten trainers' manual regarding the Kentucky Derby: the "two-prep" and "unraced juvenile" rules.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Change of Speed

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Conventional wisdom suggests front-running horses have a huge advantage if they are allowed to set the tortoise-like fractions established in this year's Blue Grass. But Polytrack has thrown conventional wisdom out the window.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Tune In

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Nobiz Like Shobiz and Tiago have a license to make beautiful music together on the first Saturday in May.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Putting Safety First

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - The CHRB's mandate is not only the right thing to do for the safety of horses, it is a benefit to owners, too, and ultimately for the tracks. Fewer injuries ensures there will be more horses in training, which will lead to larger field sizes, which usually translates to increased pari-mutuel handle. Owners are always happier to have horses racing and training rather than convalescing or recovering.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Hoosier Daddy

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - Many state racing commissioners talk about cracking down on cheaters in our sport. Indiana regulators are taking serious action.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    New York State of Mess

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - If you're a little confused about the future of racing in New York, join the club. If you're not confused, you're probably not thinking clearly.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Turn Signal

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- Twenty years ago, in the infancy of whole-card simulcasting, there were fears that only the so-called "super tracks" would survive -- those offering the highest-quality racing signals to receiving sites around the country.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Fade to Black

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> -- One of the interesting things about Thoroughbred racing is the penchant so many people have of knocking something into oblivion, and later complaining about the fact it's gone. Take TVG, for example.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Consistently Inconsistent

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - I had to go all the way to Dubai to hear a panel discussion about how racing officials in various American jurisdictions have different interpretations about the most basic rules infraction.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    A Life of Giving

    <i>By Ray Paulick</i> - So many people owe thanks to Jonabell Farm founder John A. Bell III, who served on countless committees with numerous industry organizations for more than a half-century.

  • Ray Paulick
Editor-in-Chief

    Breaking the Code

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> -- While efforts to reform the bloodstock market have been stalled since the introduction of a Code of Ethics in 2004, a rallying cry can be heard from across the ocean as the new president of the Thoroughbred Breeders' Association in England calls for reform.

  • Ray Paulick
Editor-in-Chief

    Going Forward

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> -- The Jan. 8 announcement of the expansion of the Breeders' Cup to two days, along with the addition of three new $1-million races is symbolic of the organization's dynamic new leadership, one that is willing to take some chances.

  • Ray Paulick
&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Lean and Clean

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The NTRA's biggest success -- its lobbying efforts -- is reason alone to continue supporting the organization as it embraces change.

  • Ray Paulick
Editor-in-Chief

    Purses and Wallet

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The gap between purses in Thoroughbred races in the United States and money spent in the American Thoroughbred auction market widened in 2006. While total purses for the year aren't yet known, the projection is that they will be up by a couple of percentage points to just north of $1.1 billion, which would be an all-time record.

  • Stopping Steroids

    Progress in racing's war on drugs started with a report in August 2000 from the National Thoroughbred Racing Association's Task Force on Racing Integrity and Drug Testing at The Jockey Club Round Table in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. The following year, the American Association of Equine Practitioners organized a "medication summit" held in conjunction with the...

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Beyond Barbaro

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Roy and Gretchen Jackson's beloved colt demonstrated other-worldly intelligence, matched only in size and scope by his courage and heart. Barbaro could play the role of the Cowardly Lion, Scarecrow, and Tin Man -- after they'd been to see the Wizard of Oz. Wouldn't it be nice if some of those attributes gravitated toward Thoroughbred industry leaders?

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Stopping Steroids

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Steroids have been at the center of scandals in numerous sports, particularly track and field and baseball, but the only steroid scandal in racing is that they are legal.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Winning Rider

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - Russell Baze, unlike former Major League baseball star Rickey Henderson, knows his place in history.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Spanning the Globe

    <em>Ray Paulick</em> - It's difficult to get away from talk of synthetic surfaces, whether it concerns racing in North America, Asia, Europe, or Dubai.

  • Deep Impact overtakes entire field to win the Japan Cup.

    Deep Impact Charges to Japan Cup Victory; Ouija Board Third

    Reigning Japanese Horse of the Year Deep Impact got the redemption his connections desperately wanted when the 4-year-old son of Sunday Silence rallied from last to win the 26th running of the $4.6-million Japan Cup (Jpn-I) at Tokyo Race Course on Sunday.

  • Alondite beats favored Seeking the Dia to win the Japan Cup Dirt.

    El Condor Pasa Colt Alondite Wins Japan Cup Dirt

    Alondite recorded his fifth consecutive victory of 2006 in Saturday's $2.4-million Japan Cup Dirt (Jpn-I), benefiting from a ground-saving ride under Hiroki Goto to win by 1 1/4-lengths over favored Seeking the Dia.

  • French shipper Freedonia among foreign runners in Sunday&#39;s Japan Cup.

    TVG Airing Weekend's International Races From Japan

    TVG will offer wagering and dual telecasts of the weekend's two major grade I international races from Japan -- Saturday's Japan Cup Dirt and Sunday's Japan Cup, a mile and one-half turf fixture featuring recent Emirates Airline Breeders' Cup Filly & Mare Turf (gr. IT) winner Ouija Board.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Japan Part I

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The Society of International Thoroughbred Auctioneers is employing a classic carrot and stick approach with the Japan Racing Association, acknowledging through official recognition of 60 graded stakes that the JRA's racing quality is high, but warning the organization that no further advancements will be recognized until non-Japanese owners are licensed to compete in that country.

  • Hollywood Races Sunday After Addressing Cushion Track Complaints

    Hollywood Park planned to conduct a full card of racing on its Cushion Track Sunday, one day after jockeys complained late in the day about "waves," or clumps of synthetic material, that a track official said were caused by problems with the equipment used to maintain the new surface.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Helping the Horses

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - The proposed strategic plan that came out of last month's Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit is one of those documents or white papers that most likely will land in one of two places: the Thoroughbred industry's dust-gathering burial ground of so many other good ideas; or the hands of a leader with the energy, influence, and personal commitment to make a difference.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Forward Progress

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - After a rocky year of changes that touched both the board of directors and the organization's top executives, stakeholders in the Breeders' Cup should feel good about its new direction.

  • William S. Farish, honored guest at 75th TCA testimonial dinner.

    Thoroughbred Club Honors Will Farish

    William S. Farish cited five current developments that give him optimism about the future of the Thoroughbred industry during his remarks as the honor guest at the Thoroughbred Club of America's 75th annual testimonial dinner, held at Keeneland Nov. 2.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Less is More

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - It's too late to change anything for 2007, but California racing will be better served by a serious reduction of racing in 2008 and beyond. It's up to the CHRB to convince the industry it's the right thing to do.

  • Filly Sold Before Fasig-Tipton Sale Should Have Been Scratched

    The second-highest-priced horse sold at this week's Fasig-Tipton Kentucky fall yearling sale -- a Chief Seattle filly purchased Tuesday for $270,000 by bloodstock agent Buzz Chace -- was bought privately for $29,000 by pinhooker John Brocklebank less than 24 hours earlier and should have been scratched, according to Fasig-Tipton officials.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Thanks for the Memories

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - This week's issue of <em>The Blood-Horse</em> takes a trip down memory lane for a look at favorite Breeders' Cup moments. Here are mine.

  • Ray Paulick&lt;br&gt;Editor-in-Chief

    Broken Record

    <em>By Ray Paulick</em> - For Thoroughbred trainers driven to succeed, it's all about numbers. That's the way it's been in the Hall of Fame career of D. Wayne Lukas, who virtually rewrote the record books in the 1980s, and that's how it is for his former assistant, Todd Pletcher, who Oct. 14 broke the single-season mark of 92 stakes victories established by Lukas in 1987.