Casie Bazay, BS, NBCAAM

Steaming's Effect Horse Hay Studied

Soaking hay in water is a common practice used to reduce dust and non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) levels for horses with respiratory or metabolic conditions. But soaking can leach essential nutrients, such as phosphorus and magnesium, from hay and be labor-intensive.

Which Deworming Method is Most Cost-Effective?

One topic horse owners have heard a lot about in the past few years is anthelmintic resistance. And while many veterinarians encourage their clients to change to fecal egg count (FEC) directed deworming from rotational deworming—something many have practiced for years or decades—some are slow to adapt. But new study results from Scotland sugge...

Feed Delivery Methods' Effects on Glucose, Insulin Response

There are a number of ways to help prevent insulin resistance (IR) or associated conditions like laminitis in horses, but did you know that how you feed your horse could be one of them? According to recently published study results, feeding methods that slow horses’ feed consumption rate can also reduce their insulin and glucose responses directly a...

Effects of High Glycemic Meals on Young Horses' Growth

Many horse owners understand the important role nutritional building blocks, such as protein and minerals, play in young horses’ growth, but they might not consider the endocrine or metabolic consequences of their feed choices. In a recent study researchers compared the differences between a low glycemic (LG) and high glycemic (HG) meal’s effe...

New Method for Scoring Sweat Losses in Horses Proposed

Warm summer weather is just around the corner, which means many owners will be hosing sweaty horses after exercise on a regular basis. But how much sweat are you rinsing down the drain after each ride? The National Research Council and German Society for Nutrition Physiology's current estimation methods depend on the amount of work the horse performs,...

PPID Risk Factors in Horses Studied

Veterinarians and scientists have made great strides in understanding, diagnosing, and treating pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID, often referred to as equine Cushing's disease)—a neuro-degenerative disorder of aged horses, in which dopamine production of the pituitary gland decreases. However, questions about the disease still abound....

A Forage-Only Diet for Young Horses in Training Evaluated

Research shows that adult performance horses can subsist on a quality forage-only diet, but what about their younger counterparts? Recent study results from a Swedish research team indicate that a high-energy, high-quality forage diet is not only adequate for growing horses, but can also reduce their risk of several health problems associated with a conce...

Diet Restriction for Equine Weight Loss

Equine obesity is an increasingly common problem, leading many owners to seek safe weight loss solutions for their horse. In most cases veterinarians and nutritionists advise restricting diet and increasing exercise, but with some horses--those suffering from laminitis, for instance--exercise might be contraindicated. This leaves dietary restriction as th...

Comparing the Effects of Two Equine Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements

Omega-3 fatty acids have proven to be beneficial for horses with arthritis or other inflammatory conditions, but when it comes to choosing a supplement, which one is best? There are two sources of equine omega-3 fatty acid supplements--one derived from algae and fish oil and the other derived from plants. Recent research performed at Colorado State Univer...

Simultaneous Ivermectin and Solanum Plant Poisoning in Horses

Ivermectin dewormer is considered safe for horses, even at up to 10 times the recommended dosage. But results of a recent case series documented by researchers at Texas A&M University (TAMU) revealed that horses consuming plants from the toxic Solanum (nightshade) family could be in danger of ivermectin poisoning, even when the anthelmintic is dosed a...

Study Evaluates Unintentional Weight Loss in Horses

Unintentional weight loss in horses is frustrating to both owners and veterinarians, especially when the horse is still eating well. Numerous causes are possible but often difficult to pinpoint. Due to the lack of descriptive information on this condition, a group of Irish researchers recently set out to establish a link between clinical findings and outc...

Study Examines Most 'Physically Effective Fiber' for Horses

Some owners might be searching for the most cost-effective ways in which to feed their horses, especially as provision prices continue to rise. Recently, a team of German researchers took a different approach to evaluating the effectiveness of horse feeds by carrying out a study establishing which diet--hay and grain or solely forage--consisted of a more ...

Chondroitin Sulfate, Glucosamine's Effects on Equine OA

Monitoring equine joint disease and determining the effects of nutraceutical agents, such as chondroitin sulfate (CS) and glucosamine (GlcN), is difficult to say the least. However, a group of Brazilian researchers recently determined that analyzing urinary glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) could be helpful, especially in mild osteoarthritis (OA) cases.

Forage-Only Diet for Performance Horses Evaluated

With countless types of grains and concentrated feed available for performance horses, some horse owners might wish for a simpler approach to feeding their equine athlete. Well here’s some good news for these owners: According to recent study results, a diet devoid of concentrates and entirely based on forage could be suitable for some high-performa...

Restricted Equine Diets and Wood Shaving Consumption

Obesity among equines seems to be a ubiquitous problem that leaves many owners seeking a weight loss program for their horse or pony. When it comes to devising a weight loss program, some caretakers turn to restricting the animal's caloric intake; however, one research team found that it's important to consider all possible materials that might be...

Demographics of Equine Donation and Adoption Examined

Horse rescues and adoption facilities typically deal with two groups of people: those who are there to adopt a horse and those there to relinquish a horse. While each situation has its own set of circumstances, the USDA recently funded a study to determine just who is relinquishing the animals and who is adopting them.

Going Green: Are Equine Diets Environmentally Friendly?

When most caretakers develop a diet for their horses, the environmental impact of the comestibles once they're passed through the horse's body often isn't the first thing they consider. But a team of researchers recently set out to see which forage-based diet is healthiest for both the horse and the environment.

Persimmon Ingestion and Colic: A Retrospective Study

Persimmon trees, commonly found in the southeastern United States, produce a fruit that's often enticing to horses and other equids. Consuming this fruit, however, can be deadly; its fibers and seeds can create an obstruction within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, resulting in potentially serious impaction colic.

Efficacy of High-Intensity Training for Racehorses

An effective training regimen is crucial for all equine athletes. One program used with racehorses, for instance, is high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT), where horses run at near top speed for short periods and then are given rest periods between sprints. How exactly trainers should implement HIIT, however, can be tricky business.

Researchers Evaluate Endocrinopathic Laminitis Prevalence

Laminitis has long been known as a condition in horses that can result from carbohydrate overload, among other causes, but it can also result from endocrine gland dysfunction; this is known as endocrinopathic laminitis. Equine Cushing's disease (also known as pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, or PPID) and equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) are two c...

Soaking Hay: How Much Sugar is Actually Removed?

Grasses and hays high in water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) can spell disaster for horses with laminitis or insulin resistance (IR). Some veterinarians and nutritionists suggest soaking hay to reduce the amount of WSC in the hay (because water-soluble means these simple sugars dissolve in water), but how much WSC content does soaking actually reduce? Accor...

Cortisol Test Might Detect Horses at Higher Risk for Colic

Preventing colic often is easier than dealing with it. But how can you tell if your horse is at risk for colicking and, thus, make necessary adjustments to his life to reduce his colic risk? A group of Brazilian researchers recently proposed that a fairly simple method, known as cortisol circadian rhythm (CCR) ratio, could be used to identify horses under...

Are Stabled Horses at Increased Risk for Developing Colic?

Every horse owner wants to avoid the dreaded "C" word, and although it sometimes is unavoidable, there are some steps owners can take to prevent colic. Housing horses in pastures rather than stalls, for example, could reduce the likelihood of a horse developing colic. According to the results of a recent study performed by a group of British res...

Racehorses, Swimming, and Colic

Performance horses are kept in top physical condition by a variety of methods, and where facilities exist, swimming can be a beneficial means of exercise. However, some veterinarians have observed an association between swimming and the onset of colic. A team of Australian researchers recently took a closer look at the link and determined that while swimm...

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