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Rick Dutrow Trainer

Tuesday February 21, 2006

A second-generation horseman, Richard Dutrow, Jr., has soared to the top of the North American training ranks at age 46.

Dutrow began as an assistant to his late father, Richard Dutrow, Sr., at age 16 and formed his own stable in New York in the late 1990s after his father returned to the Maryland circuit. Due to the association with prominent New York owner Sandy Goldfarb, Dutrow quickly became the leading trainer in New York, taking the title by number of wins in 2001 and 2002. Since spring of 2001, he has subsequently tallied eight leading trainer titles at New York Racing Association race meets.

In 2005, Dutrow-trained Saint Liam and Silver Train provided him with his first Breeders' Cup World Thoroughbred Championship winners. Winner of the Breeders' Cup Classic Powered by Dodge (gr. I), Saint Liam was honored as North American Horse of the Year and retired to stud. Silver Train, who is still in training this year, won the TVG Breeders' Cup Sprint (gr. I).

Among the topics Dutrow will discuss are his 2005 season, Saint Liam's Horse of the Year campaign, his keys to success, and the status of some of the top horses in his barn.

MODERATOR:
Today, we are privileged to have as our guest a man who is enjoying a period of great success at the moment and has agreed to spend some time with us on this Dark Day at Gulfstream Park, from where he is currently managing his stable.

Buffalo, NY:
Your father, Dick, trained my all-time favorite racehorse, Kings' Swan, the "King of Aqueduct," who sadly passed away on Feb. 7 of this year at the age of 26. From 1985 up to Kings' Swans' retirement in 1990, did you assist your father with any aspects of the horses' training and racing?

Dutrow:
I was with the horse for 4-5 years but my dad trained him and made all the decisions. I did not call any of the shots. He was a professional horse to be around; he did everything you wanted a horse to do.

Hollywood, CA:
Do you train for any horse partnerships (syndicates) and, if so, who are they and how can I get in touch with them? Also, do you think that is a good way to get involved with the game?

Dutrow:
We have so many people who go together on horses. We have about 75 people who go in on horses with us, but the one person who puts most of them together is Sandy Goldfarb. We try to get a lot of people involved in ownership. It's an excellent way to start because you can go in with a small percentage of costs but you also get to see the bills that come in, like from the blacksmith and the veterinarian. You can learn cheaply as you go and later decide if you want to go stronger or stay at that level.

Best of Talkin HorsesTo read the complete transcript of this chat, along with many others, check out Best of Talkiní Horses.

Best of Talkin’ Horses features provocative “chats” with some of Thoroughbred racing’s most prominent names. Adapted from “Talkin’ Horses,” the popular weekly online chat series hosted by Bloodhorse.com, this edited collection provides additional insights by Ron Mitchell, editor and moderator of “Talkin’ Horses."

 

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