Horse Health

News for caring for the health of your horse provided by The Horse.

West Nile Research

Scientists at Fort Dodge Animal Health's laboratories in Kansas City, Mo., are working to develop a vaccine against West Nile virus (WNV).

Ovarian Tumors

Ovarian tumors can cause severe behavioral changes in a mare. They also can limit a mare's reproductive career by damaging her internal organs, writes Dr. Christina S. Cable in the March edition of The Horse.

West Nile Virus Update

The National Veterinary Services Laboratory recently confirmed two additional equine clinical cases of West Nile virus (WNV), one in New Jersey and the other in New York. The New Jersey case involved a 4-month-old colt, the youngest horse ever known to have developed clinical illness due to WNV in the U.S.

Safe Delivery Tips

Most equine births are uneventful, but there are some steps you can take to make sure your mare's labor and delivery are safe and successful.

Strangles Cases Move Time, Site of 'Repo' Horse Sale

"Just when you think it can't get much worse, it got worse," said Boyd Browning, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Fasig-Tipton, on Feb. 5. Browning was discussing complications involving the pending sale of 89 horses repossessed by Fasig-Tipton and Keeneland from the Maryland mystery buyer, Bernice L. Givens Sykes, who signed tickets for nearly $700,000 for 134 horses at the Keeneland November and Fasig-Tipton Midlantic December mixed sale and then failed to pay for them.

Yearling Radiographic Studies

Radiographs of a yearling’s legs offer a unique glance into the horse’s athletic future, according to Albert Kane, DVM, MPVM, PhD, Post-Doctoral Fellow in Biomedical Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine at Colorado State University (CSU). At the American Association of Equine Practitioners’ recent convention, Kane presented findings of a land...

Morris Grants Fund New Research

The Morris Animal Foundation is funding 14 new equine health studies during its 2001 fiscal year that will focus on colic, digestive tract disorders, foal diseases, genetics, infectious diseases, musculoskeletal disorders, pain management, and surgery.

Supplement Use Complicated

Different workloads, stages of growth, pregnancy, and lactation require different dietary configurations for the horse. To meet those needs, horse owners often want to use supplements. However, you should realize that supplements could cause more problems than they solve, writes Dr. Joseph J. Bertone in the February edition of The Horse.

Equine Health Issues Expressed to New Administration

Senator Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has encouraged Ann Veneman, Secretary of Agriculture within the Bush administration, to pay special attention to horses, characterizing them as "Kentucky's number one agriculture moneymaker." Recommending to Veneman that there be more research into causes and cures of equine diseases, McConnell noted that the health of domestic horses and the ability of Americans to import and export horses are vital to the industry.

Flehmen Response in Horses

Most of us, at one time or another, have seen a horse tilt up his head and curl his upper lip in a "horse laugh." Although the expression is amusing, it actually has a practical purpose.

The Impact of Early Training on Thoroughbreds

The economics of Thoroughbred racing are such that most owners and trainers aim to have their horses ready for racing as 2-year-olds. On the other hand, we know that lameness problems are the most important reason for wastage in Thoroughbred racehorses, and some perceive that these injuries are due, in large part, to the training and racing of horses too early in life.

Breakthrough Made on EPM Research

The most recent Journal of Parasitology contained an article that opens the door for battling equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Researchers and others found they could use the common domestic cat as the experimental intermediate host for the life cycle of the causative protozoal parasite.

Hay Cubes Have Benefits, Dangers

Hay cubes are favored by many trainers of Thoroughbred and Standardbred racehorses because they tend to be highly digestible and less "bulky" in the gut than long-stemmed hay. But that very digestibility -- the ease and speed with which they are chewed and swallowed -- can be a potential problem.

News By Topic

News By Region

News By Date

PrevNext
October 2014
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 

Most Popular Stories

Special Offer

The Blood-Horse

Get 8 FREE issues of The Blood-Horse!

Don't miss a minute of the action...with 8 FREE issues of The Blood-Horse. And if you like them, you can continue with a full year of issues and get the next edition of the Stallion Register, plus complete coverage of the Kentucky Derby and Breeders' Cup World Championships. Click here to learn more.