Stud Fees

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Gone West's Fee Remains $125,000

Gone West, whose yearling filly out of Touch of Greatness brought the top price of $3.8 million at the Keeneland September sale, will stand once again for $125,000.

Lane's End Sets Mineshaft's Fee at $100,000

Move over Vindication. There's a new leader among the stallions entering stud in 2004. Mineshaft, the leader on the NTRA poll, will begin his stallion career in 2004 for $100,000, twice that of Vindication, last year's champion juvenile male.

Lane's End Keeps A.P. Indy at $300,000 for 2003

A.P. Indy, who is having another good year at stud with eight stakes winners and the earners of $3.8 million, will stand in 2003 for the same $300,000 amount that he stood for in 2002, according to figures released by William S. Farish's Lane's End Farm.

Stallion Access Sale Averages $29,197

After a year's hiatus, Stallion Access' Champagne Sale of Selected Seasons and Shares returned the evening of Aug. 9. Held at Fasig-Tipton's Humphrey S. Finney pavilion in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., the sale saw 33 of the 44 no-guarantee seasons for 2003 sell for $963,500. In addition, two stallion shares sold for $182,000. The auction, a bellwether sale for next year's stud fees, averaged $29,197.

Fee Follies: Breeding at the Right Level

The late John M.S. Finney once compared the science of Thoroughbred breeding with Albert Einstein's theory of relativity. "Where E represents equine investment," Finney said, "M represents money, and C represents confusion--E equals MC squared."

From the Print Edition: First Crop Weanling Report

Most commercial breeders peering into a crystal ball in 1999 saw nothing but blue skies. However, as are the rules, planning out two or three years ahead can prove to be a tricky game. Breeders selling weanlings from first-crop sires in 2001 have experienced more than a little turbulence from the time they planned their 2000 matings to when they brought their crop to market at last month's major breeding stock sales.

From the Print Edition: First Crop Weanling Report

Most commercial breeders peering into a crystal ball in 1999 saw nothing but blue skies. However, as are the rules, planning out two or three years ahead can prove to be a tricky game. Breeders selling weanlings from first-crop sires in 2001 have experienced more than a little turbulence from the time they planned their 2000 matings to when they brought their crop to market at last month's major breeding stock sales.

Storm Cat Stud Fee Rises to $500,000

Leading sire Storm Cat, who already had the highest stud fee in the world, will stand for even more in 2002. Ric Waldman of Overbrook Farm confirmed Friday that the 18-year-old stallion will stand the next breeding season for $500,000.

Storm Cat's Stud Fee Could Reach $400,000

It's no secret that breeders will be paying higher stud fees in 2001, and one stallion whose fee is expected to rise into the stratosphere is William T. Young's Storm Cat, who stood the 2000 season for $300,000 at his owner's Overbrook Farm near Lexington, Ky.

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