Horse Health

Health news, veterinary advice, and educational tools to keep your horse healthy provided by The Horse

Deadly Spring Syndromes

Good news travels fast in the horse business; bad news travels even faster. In the case of an outbreak of mysterious early fetal loss and late-gestation foal loss, cooperation and quick sharing of information served to help researchers investigate and track down a killer--maybe.

In several states this spring, including Ohio, West Virginia, and pos...

Lasix Now SALIX For Veterinary Purposes

Lasix is now SALIX in the veterinary industry. When Intervet acquired Hoechst Roussel Vet in November 1999, Intervet agreed that Aventis Pharmaceuticals would retain Lasix as the registered trademark for the human drug. So the veterinary furosemide product has become SALIX.

Melnyks Fund Belmont Child Care Center

Eugene and Laura Melnyk announced that they have committed $1 million toward the construction of a child care center at Belmont Park to care primarily for the children of backstretch employees. Groundbreaking is scheduled for this November, with the facility to be completed in six-to-nine months.

Lasix Has A New Name

The name has changed, but the drug has not. Lasix is now SALIX in the veterinary industry. When Intervet acquired Hoechst Roussel Vet in November 1999, Intervet agreed that Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Hoechst AG) would retain Lasix as the registered trademark for the human drug. This is why the veterinary furosemide product has now become SALIX.

Kentucky's Pericarditis Cases Called 'Clinically Significant'

Additional cases of pericarditis are occurring in Kentucky and possibly other states (including Ohio), with the problem now claiming lives, according to Dr. Doug Byars, head of the internal medicine unit at Hagyard-Davidson-McGee (HDM) veterinary firm in Lexington, Ky., who said veterinarians at his clinic and those at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital are starting to see horses previously treated for pericarditis returning to the clinics with more heart problems.

Veterinarian Sheds Light on Cloudy Fetal Fluids

A Kentucky veterinarian who specializes in mare reproduction, fetal ultrasound, and fetal sexing has studied pregnancy videos 1996 and 1998 and foal production the following years and has found that some degree of cloudiness in chorionic or amnionic fluid did not necessarily mean the mare would lose her foal or she would have an abnormal foal.

Researchers Zero In on Cyanide as Cause of Foal Loss Syndrome

Researchers at the University of Kentucky Gluck Equine Center have made significant progress in their quest to find the cause of the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome. According to reports presented Thursday during an informational forum at Keeneland, black cherry trees located in close proximity to horse pastures are the primary source of the cyanide that was detected in tests of dead foals and fetuses from mares that aborted.

NTRA, Horse Council Continue Disaster Relief Meetings With Federal Officials

American Horse Council president Jay Hickey and National Thoroughbred Racing Association deputy commissioner Greg Avioli are meeting in Washington, D.C., Tuesday afternoon with Caroly Cooksie, deputy administrator of the U.S. Department of Agriculture disaster relief loan programs. The meeting is a follow-up to talks held last week in Washington involving Hickey and NTRA commissioner Tim Smith and a number of federal legislators, including Rep. Larry Combest, an Amarillo, Texas, Republican who is chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.

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