Christy M. West

Supporting Limb Laminitis in Casted Horses (AAEP 2011)

“Supporting limb laminitis (laminitis developing in the hoof opposite a severely painful limb) can be one of the most challenging and often times unpredictable complications in horses with severe, unilateral lameness.” began Joanna Virgin, DVM, currently of Oakridge Equine Hospital, in Edmond, Okla., at the 2011 American Association of Equine ...

Evaluating Horse Feet, Legs, and Gaits (AAEP 2011)

“I challenge you to every day to improve your powers of observation,” began Ric Redden, DVM, founder of the International Equine Podiatry Center in Versailles, Ky., during the 2011 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Nov. 18-22 in San Antonio, Texas. “Believe half of what you see and everything you understand.&r...

2011's Top Equine Surgery/Lameness Studies

Each year, researchers publish hundreds of equine surgery and lameness studies. During the 2011 American Association of Equine Practitioners convention, held Nov. 18-22 in San Antonio, Texas, some of the most clinically relevant surgery and lameness studies were presented during the annual Kester News Hour. Scott E. Palmer, DVM, Dipl. AVBP (Equine Practic...

Manuka Honey for Healing Horse Wounds (AAEP 2011)

With the popularity of natural treatments on the rise, it’s no surprise that manuka honey—which is produced by bees—visiting the manuka bush found exclusively in New Zealand, has gained a good deal of attention. Vendors claim that it has antibacterial wound-healing properties in humans and in experimental animals.

Recombinant Hormones Make Mares Cycle in Winter (AAEP 2011)

People have successfully shortened or lengthened mares’ estrous cycles for decades, but it’s a much taller order to induce cycling in a mare that’s not cycling at all. However, researchers recently reported good success with inducing ovulation in winter anestrous (noncycling) mares via a new hormone therapy regimen at the 2011 American A...

Physical Therapy for Stifle Problems in Horses (AAEP 2011)

Many horses struggle with stifle dysfunction due to injury, surgery, immobility, or disease. According to Jennifer H. Brooks, PT, MEd (Masters of Education), of Equine Rehabilitation Services, in Brookline, N.H., the stifle joint (comparable to a human’s knee) is the largest, most complex joint in the horse, and dysfunction left untreated can lead t...

Hydrotherapy to Rehabilitate Injuries in Horses (AAEP 2011)

Humans hear it often when it's time to get back in shape after an injury or surgery: "Get in the pool." Doctors know the increased resistance and buoyancy of water makes you do a significant amount of muscular work to move while providing very low impact/stress on bones and joints, so it's an ideal rehabilitation method.

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