Jockey Club Launches Injury Database

Jockey Club Launches Injury Database
Photo:

The Jockey Club has launched the Equine Injury Database system that will provide the racing industry with its first national database of racing injuries. The Equine Injury Database grew out of a proposal first put forth at the Welfare and Safety of the Racehorse Summit in Lexington in October 2006.
 
The primary objectives of the Equine Injury Database are to: identify the frequency, types and outcome of racing injuries using a standardized format that will generate valid statistics; identify markers for horses at increased risk of injury; and serve as a data source for research directed at improving safety and preventing injuries

The official launch of the Equine Injury Database follows a pilot program that ran from June 1, 2007, to July 12, 2008, whereby more than 3,000 injury reports were received and recorded. More recently, the system underwent comprehensive testing and review at racetracks in California.
 
Alan Marzelli, president of The Jockey Club, said, “The Jockey Club has devoted significant financial resources and technological expertise to the project from concept to implementation in order to ensure that the Equine Injury Database became a reality. The Equine Injury Database software module that enables racetracks and racing organizations to participate in the program will be provided free of charge. The Jockey Club, through two of its for-profit subsidiary companies, InCompass Solutions Inc. and The Jockey Club Technology Services Inc., will underwrite the cost of operating the system going forward as a service to the industry.”
 
Besides funding the development of the project, The Jockey Club is utilizing its central database infrastructure and its access to pedigree data and Equibase race result data. It also utilizes the InCompass Race Track Operations (RTO) software applications that are used by every racetrack in North America. (Many racetrack and regulatory veterinarians already use the RTO system when performing pre-race veterinary exams.)
 
“We are especially grateful to Dr. Mary Scollay and Dr. Rick Arthur for their assistance with the pilot program and system testing, and to all the regulatory veterinarians around the country who provided their expertise throughout the development of the Equine Injury Database,” said Marzelli.
 
Stuart Janney III, chairman of The Jockey Club’s Thoroughbred Safety Committee, said, “The creation and launch of the Equine Injury Database system fills a glaring void in our industry. We are encouraged by the interest and support received from racetracks during the pilot phase of the project, and we strongly recommend the same level of support and participation now that the system is fully operational.”

Most Popular Stories