Flores Undergoes Elbow Surgery After Fall
by Margaret Ransom
Date Posted: 2/27/2005 1:23:31 PM
Last Updated: 2/27/2005 10:11:47 PM

Jockey David Flores was released from Arcadia Methodist Hospital early Sunday morning, a day after suffering a dislocated elbow, ligament damage, and facial abrasions in a three-horse spill in Santa Anita's eighth race.

Flores was injured when his mount, Bornwithit, fell over rival Glen Canyon, ridden by Julio Garcia. Bornwithit broke down and fell at the three-eighths pole. Another horse, Indiaman, ridden by Alex Bisono, also fell over the top of Glen Canyon.

Garcia and Bisono weren't seriously injured, although Bisono was examined for a possible left shoulder separation. According to Bisono's agent, Vic Lipton, the 20-year-old will most likely be back in the irons on Thursday.

"He did dodge the bullet, so to speak," Lipton said. "He had no broken bones, all X-rays were negative, and there was no internal bleeding; but he has some bruises and muscle soreness."

Garcia, who escaped with scrapes and bruises, had only one mount on Sunday which was scratched.

The 37-year-old Flores underwent surgery late Saturday night to remove bone spurs from the injured elbow. Doctors had trouble putting the elbow back into place, according to Flores' agent, Scott McClellan, and the jockey is expected to be out of action 6-8 weeks.

"I'm OK," Flores said. "I feel lucky."

The recuperation means Flores will miss a season in Japan, where he was set to ride for six weeks beginning in early March.

Flores will also lose the mount aboard NetJets Breeders' Cup Mile (gr. IT) winner Singletary in Saturday's Frank E. Kilroe Mile (gr. IT) for trainer Don Chatlos. Alex Solis will be aboard the son of Sultry Song in the Kilroe, but once Flores returns he will most likely regain the ride, Chatlos said.

Both Glen Canyon and Indiaman were euthanized due to their injuries. Bornwithit suffered several cuts and scrapes, but was otherwise unharmed, according to trainer Bob Baffert's assistant, Jimmy Barnes.

According to state veterinarian Dr. William Bell, Indiaman died from a broken neck. Glen Canyon, Bell said, suffered a compound fracture of the left front cannon bone.

A fourth horse, Grey Misty, was impeded by the accident and had to be eased, but avoided contact.

(Chart, Equibase)

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